Photo by slightlyeverything on Flickr.

Bad Job Board Titles

Human Resources personnel. You gotta love ‘em.

They’re the people who make sure you get paid every week, or biweekly or however often you get paid. They’re the ones who you talk to when you have a complaint about another employee. HR personnel are also, generally, responsible for posting job reqs.

If you go to Dice.com, or Monster, or Career Builder, you’re going to see a whole lot of job postings that, as you scan the titles, start to blur together a bit.

The reason for this is because almost all job postings carry a cliché name based on the fact that generic templates (or more accurately, “loosely specific”) are used and common titles are used. This usually is because the HR person who puts together the job listing is not familiar enough with the minutiae of the specific position as, say, a hiring manager might be.

So you end up with titles like “Web Developer”.

What does it meeeeeeeeeaaaan?

Many of you know that, about three weeks ago, I lost my job to a reorganization at the company I worked for as a WordPress Developer (another loosely specific title). Since that time, I have been talking to a variety of companies that have proactively reached out to me, knowing my reputation and experience in the WordPress world. I have generally avoided the job sites because of the problem described above.

“Web Developer” as a title is misleading, vague and all-encompassingly wrong. Why do you say that, you might ask.

Generally speaking, a web developer job is listed like this:

Acme, Inc. is seeking a driven, highly talented candidate to fill our Web Developer position. In this position, you will demonstrate creativity as you work with others to accommodate our clients needs. Eligible candidates posses intimate knowledge of the following

  • HTML5
  • CSS3
  • jQuery, or similar Javascript framework
  • SASS or LESS
  • Grunt
  • Node
  • AngularJS

Please forward your portfolio to XYZ@ABC.com.

Etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.

This is, in fact, a valid “web developer” role.

A valid web developer role may also look like this:

Acme, Inc. is seeking a driven, highly talented candidate to fill our Web Developer position. In this position, you will demonstrate problem solving as you design, build, test and deploy a RESTful API and database cluster that can grow as needed. We prefer the candidate has some knowledge of algorithms and scaling. Candidates should possess intimate knowledge of the following:

  • NoSQL
  • MariaDB/MySQL
  • PHP/Python/Ruby
  • Vagrant
  • Agile and/or Scrum development environments
  • Moderate familiarity with Ubuntu or other Linux environment

Please forward your resume and a link to your Github account to XYZ@ABC.com

Very similar, and yet very different job listings. Yet they can both be referred to a “Web Developer” jobs, even though one is, more accurately, a “Front End Developer” role and another is “Back End Developer”.

By calling a job a “Web Developer” job, you have people who have only futzed around in Dreamweaver and only consider the user experience or interface looking at positions meant for data architects. And you have folks who know how to stand up an EC2 cluster and build and deploy Django applications with high redundancy and caching layers looking at jobs meant for the people who lose sleep at night over typefaces.

Everyone loses.

The candidate loses the opportunity to find the position she is really looking for because it’s buried under a bad title, or she gets so tired of looking for the real gold in the pile of rocks that she gives up.

The employer loses the opportunity because the signal to noise ratio on applications is terrible. Or, people just get tired of applying for mislabeled jobs.

So please, hiring managers, at least write up your “recommended” job req for HR. You know the job better than anyone. You know who you are looking for. Give it a proper name!

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Photo Credit: Chez Andre on Flickr.

Entrepreneurial Priorities if You Don’t Want to Despise Yourself at Age 80

With the exception of a general, “We’re hiring” post a few days ago, my site has been largely neglected for the past year. It’s not that I don’t want to write. I do. And it’s not like I don’t have things to say because, if you know me, I do. I really do. And it’s not even that what I’d like to say isn’t all that important…. because it generally is.

I feel the need to write today, however, because it directly relates to why I don’t write as much as I used to. And it directly relates to why I, in the eyes of the typical startup founder or venture capitalist, am not a great entrepreneur. In their eyes. I’ll admit that I’m a terrible day to day running a business guy. I’m a terrible “take care of the basics” like health care and witholding taxes” guy. I’m actually a pretty decent entrepreneur though. Put me on the phone with a prospective client, and I can speak their language and close a deal. At the end of the day, being an entrepreneur is all about making money so you can live to play another day.

Or is it?

It’s also about life and lifestyle.

I feel really compelled to write about this because, though I sorta took a mental break from the tech startup world for a bit while I focused on my job and my new life back in on the east coast (and, you know, survival and keeping a roof over my head), I’ve dipped my toes back into the water.  I am as alarmed today as I was two years ago about the entrepreneurial scam that is peddled by basically everyone.

There’s an entrepreneurial scam?

Funny you should ask! Yes. And it goes something like this: “If you’re not willing to give 24/7 to build your startup or company, you shouldn’t be an entrepreneur”.

Jason Calacanis, famously, said in one of his listserv emails on September 27, 2008, eight days after the market crash of September 19, 2008 and two days after the FDIC seized Washington Mutual Bank, that the sign of someone (paraphrasing here) worth being hired/invested in in the startup world is the person who will gladly come in on Sunday. This was the actual passage from that email:

Hold an optional off-site breakfast meeting on a Sunday and see who shows up: If folks don’t show up for you to grow/save the company on a Sunday for a two hour breakfast, they probably aren’t going to step up when the sh#$%t really hits the fan. You need to know who the real killers on your team are and you need to get close with them now. Again, it’s fine to have 9-5ers on your team–if you’re the Post Office. You can’t have them at a startup company. Note: if you reading this and saying I’m anti-family, save it. Folks don’t have to work at startups and some of the hardest working folks I’ve met have families and figure out how to balance things.

UGH. So much wrong with this sentiment. This sentiment screams, “I am what I do” and that is simply the most self-loathing sentiment you can have. It is neither something to be proud of nor is it healthy mentally or physically. I have a lot of respect for entrepreneurs who will go to the Farmer’s Market on Sunday morning. Or who take their kids to the park. Or who go to brunch with their husband/wife/girlfriend/boyfriend. Not so much for the person who opts to work instead of doing these things.

Here’s what that mentality of roughly 2003-2008 got me. It got me a career, yes. It also got me a divorce and years of my life I will never get back. At nearly 38 years of age, that is a lot to bypass in the service of the almighty dollar, ego, prestige and “fame” (whatever the fuck that means).

While I worked my corporate 9-5, I was coming home and then working another 8 hours on client works, building a company or other nonsense. I neglected my son (who fortunately still loves me to death) and my wife, at the time, by working every night until 3am just to pass out exhausted and wake up at 6:30am to go to work again.

Those lost opportunities to be present were squandered because I bought into the charade that if I work longer and harder, I’ll succeed more and have a better life. Rubbish, hogwash, nyet, NO!

After my ex-wife and I split, I naturally did some soul-searching. Work wasn’t our only problem. But I’d say it was a contributing factor to all the problems I could see. I decided to do a 30-day “work cleanse”… For 30 days, work normal business hours – 9-5, 10-6, whatever… and then put my work down and find something to do to occupy my time. That was a hard thing to do since my work was my identity and my habit. However, after 30 days, I realized I was feeling more energized. I got more sleep. This enabled me to focus better on my work when I was doing it. It helped me get things done faster. I felt more alive.

By and large, this 30 day drill has become my lifestyle now six years later. I typically still work Monday through Friday, 9 to 5. I avoid after hours work or weekend work if I can help it. Though I still take side work, one project at a time in digestible portions, because… a little extra cash every month is nice. But, today, I spend time with my girlfriend, cook dinner sometimes, and do stuff that is fulfilling to my life (usually!) instead of investing all my energy into something that will ultimately fade away.

My greatest fear is that, in my latter years, I will look back on my life with regret, building something that doesn’t last while sacrificing the things that really matter on the altar of snake oil salesmen. You are not what you do. Your time spent does not define your character.

In the words of Trent Reznor Johnny Cash, three months before his wife’s death and seven months before his own:

What have I become 
My sweetest friend 
Everyone I know goes away 
In the end 
And you could have it all 
My empire of dirt 
I will let you down 
I will make you hurt

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Looking for a Top Notch WordPress/PHP Developer

If you’re in Baltimore and are a developer, or if you are in Baltimore and know someone who is a developer… Heck, if you’re in DC and are a developer or know a developer, we need you. (You can be to work in under an hour on the MARC train).

Some of you know what I do and who I do it for. I work for a company that has consistently been rated in the top 3 companies to work for. We’re fun and relaxed and our content producers focus on publishing in the financial industry.

Dogs are regularly in the office. We wear shorts and sandals to work. It’s an a-political group – as in office politics. Everyone works well together from the execs down to customer service.

We believe in “Fail cheap and quick” as a lean startup sort of mentality and everyone is empowered to just try stuff if it makes sense.

What *I* do is build awesome web technology to support the business. Plenty of WordPress but now we’re building out huge APIs for reporting and consumer-facing tools. And that’s not WordPress. That’s Laravel and MVC, if you’re curious.

We are looking to add another developer with real chops. PHP, JS, REST APIs, SQL for now with NoSQL as a viable thing for the future. We largely operate on Rackspace and Amazon EC2.

I’d love to hear from you or your developer friend. Send me your resume and cover letter but let me see your github as well!

abrazell@agorafinancial.com

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