Technosailor Sale Update

The public sale is cancelled. Several folks have inquired on Skype and by email regarding the status of the sale, and unfortunately, public interest has not coalesced. This is disappointing for me, though it does give me some insight that I’ll share.

  • The site is not properly monetized. Many were very surprised that the site makes approximately $250 in revenue. Quite a few people make a whole lot more than that for much smaller sites. I recognize that this is an area that needs improvement and I’m taking steps to increase the revenue base.
  • Percieved value is in the eye of the beholder. More specifically, no one values any site more than the owner. This is natural as the owner puts “blood, sweat and tears” into a site and sees value that maybe is not there. Do not think that depth of archives necessarily translates to value.
  • The emotional roller coaster that goes along with sales of deeply personal properties is not something to ignore. During this process, I have gone from excitement to anger and hit all the emotional scales in between.
  • Private is always better than public. Maybe my biggest mistake in this process was posting the auction at SitePoint. I recieved derision and ridicule by onlookers not interested in bidding, but interested in making sure everyone else knew how they felt. This was numerous people and it probably contributed to the anger mentioned in bullet point 3. The private discussions held with two particular parties, however, was quite good and open and honest. Though the sale did not develop as I had hoped, I definitely have a respect for the parties and would be interested in doing business in the future.
  • Value is found in the blogger and this was an eye opener to me. I expected to sell Technosailor and be happy, but the interested parties were more interested in me. Though I was flattered, sometimes business gets in the way of business and no one wins.

Of course, this sale is publically off and I don’t anticipate private offers. I do leave the door open for serious parties to offer a deal – whatever it is. I can’t guarantee I’ll sell and I don’t even know what I expect dollar wise. But if you’re interested, please feel free to deal. In the meantime, I’ll continue to blog here and continue to do what I always have done – with an eye to the future to make the blog more desirable going forward. You’ll probably see some changes around here. More revenue stream. More organized, stable flow. Topical shifts and concise conversation. It’s an evolution that has been waiting to happen.

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Aaron Brazell

Aaron Brazell is a Baltimore, MD-based WordPress developer, a co-founder at WP Engine, WordPress core contributor and author. He wrote the book WordPress Bible and has been publishing on the web since 2000. You can follow him on Twitter, on his personal blog and view his photography at The Aperture Filter.

9 thoughts on “Technosailor Sale Update”

  1. I agree with the argument that value is found in the blogger. Especially in sites like yours Aaron wherein you’re the only writer. Sure Technosailor has a “brand” already but it’s really you.

    In my opinion, unless you’re like TUAW who has a lot of bloggers writing for one site/blog, much of the value is squared on your shoulders. Even then, if you decide to sell TUAW and do away with the current bloggers it will see a hit in value.

    So, the only way I think that you’ll be able to get a lot for Technosailor is if you go with it :)

  2. I’ve followed this sale from the beginning. It has reinforced what I thought all along.

    No matter how much someone sells themselves as a professional blogger, or blogging expert. The real test is in results and performance. Good old fashion common sense will always prevail.

  3. I am with Juan. It’s really not what your ‘blog is worth’, it’s ‘what are you worth, as reflected in your blog’. Selling the blog is simply selling your content thus far, as well as the domain name. It wouldn’t continue to grow and be successful without you.

  4. I recieved derision and ridicule by onlookers not interested in bidding, but interested in making sure everyone else knew how they felt.

    Funny — I’m going through something similar at the moment. I know it’s easier said than done, but you have to consider the source and ask yourself how much value you place in the opinions given. When the answer is “not much” — well, move on.

    Sorry people are being jerky — it’s hard to see people poke fun or make rude remarks about your life’s work. It’s like making fun of someone’s kid, if you ask me. Bleh.

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