Cómo aprovechar la Reputación de Nuestro Producto

Manejando de regreso a casa estas vacaciones, vi un Toyota accidentado en el borde de la autopista y no pude evitar pensar “Es una trampa!” recordando el famoso comercial de Toyota (click aquí para verlo en YouTube).

En este comercial, el malo de la película se disfraza como una bella modelo en apuros, accidentada al lado de la carretera en su Toyota Corolla, pero es descubierta cuando sus victimas se percatan de que el auto es un Corolla y estos “no se accidentan.”

Toyota aprovechó la impecable reputación de su Corolla para crear este comercial. Lo interesante es que el comercial vino una vez que la reputación existía y no para crear esta reputación. Esta estrategia solidifica la reputación de Toyota como una marca confiable.

El caso contrario, tratar de convencer al cliente de una supuesta característica de nuestro producto casi nunca funciona (ver el caso de Wal-Mart y su blog) y menos ahora que estamos todos conectados, cualquiera puede montar una página web y nuestras quejas llegan a millones de oídos en un click.

¿Tienes algún ejemplo para compartir? Deja tu comentario y enciende la discusión.

Never Trust a Chef…

Remember Sy Sperling? He was the President of Hair Club for Men who is famously quoted as saying, “I’m not just the president, I’m also a client”.

Other phrases such as, “Never trust a chef who won’t eat his own cooking”, or similarly, “Never trust a skinny chef” have come to represent the sentiment that the best vote of confidence in a product is when the owner/producer/creator also uses it.

Last night, Biz Stone, one of the founders of Twitter blasted this message out to his Twitter followers:

looking at an email receipt from iTunes for a vampire series I apparently bought””but I haven’t any vampire shows!

Fairly innocuous, I suppose. I hope the series was Buffy. Sarah Michelle Geller is HAWT. The point is, unlike many CEOs and company spokesgroupies, Biz is not promoting Twitter outright. He is not telling people the multiple virtues of Twitter, or explaining best practices of Twitter. Perhaps because Twitter doesn’t lend itself to a defined set of rules defining what it is or what it should do, but that is beside the point. Biz’s endorsement of his own product is a plain, everyday use of his own product in a non-promotional way.

Marketers need to get this. CEO’s need to understand this. PR people need to learn this. Your best sales technique is the technique that is not a technique. It’s just use. We’re watching you and how you use your product. The best time to sell is when you are at your least salesy.

Your thoughts?

The 2007 Travel Awards

I have never traveled in my life as much as I have this past year. I have taken 12 trips and I think I’m done for the year – though I do think I may need a Toronto trip before Christmas. At any rate, I can look back at various trips and point to them as memorable for one reason or another. So, I present to you the 2007 Travel Awards. These awards are only for my own trips but I’d love to hear about your trips as well.

  • Longest Trip: Toronto, 9 days, May 26-June 3. This trip encompassed Mesh Conference as well as b5 business in Toronto
  • Shortest Trip: 1 Day (overnight), Toronto, Aug 23-24
  • Most Enjoyable Trip: Gnomedex 7
  • Least Enjoyable Trip: SXSW ’07 – The Hampton Inn was the beginning of a bad bad trip
  • Trip I least wanted to go on that I enjoyed the most: PodCamp Philly
  • Trip I most wanted to go on that I enjoyed the least: PodCamp Boston 2
  • Best Networking Event: Blog World Expo
  • Most drunken event: San Francisco, January 2007
  • Most Expensive Trip: Blog World Expo, Las Vegas

Did you travel at all this year? What are your awards?