NBC, NFL Deal Puts Adobe One More Step Back

Quietly, a sleeping giant has been evolving. That sleeping giant is Silverlight, a Microsoft rich media technology to rival Adobe’s Flash/Flex platform.

On this date, July 28, there is a dearth of Silverlight content on the web. Almost all the major video sites use Flash players, with Hulu, an NBC property, being a probable exception. However, that is about to change.

NBC Universal is a partner with Microsoft, and the two have collaborated to produce properties such as MSNBC among other joint ventures. In just a short week from now, the next generation of the Microsoft-NBC Universal partnership will unfold before an international audience. NBC’s coverage of the Olympics will be live streamed over the internet using Microsoft Silverlight technology.

I’ve talked to people recently who have discussed the Silverlight platform in the context of competition with Adobe and the ubiquity of Flash. The consensus is that Flash will be here for awhile yet, but as more and more adoption of Silverlight occurs, the Flash footprint could wane significantly. Developers need reason to use a new technology and with the absence of such reason, the status quo will remain.

That reason could very well be the widespread success, if it is a success, of the Olympic coverage on Olympics.com.

But wait, there’s more.

Silicon Alley Insider reported yesterday that an announcement would be made announcing NBC live coverage of Sunday Night Football during the 2008 season over the web. That’s right. Streaming games, multiple camera angles, instant in-home replay, statistics and more.

Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.

Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.

As a side note, the NFL about face on the use of the internet is interesting. Those who have read this site for a long time recall the video podcast that I did from Ravens training camp that was shut down. The video is in my archives if you want to go looking. It’s quite funny, actually.

The NFL is calling this a one year experiment to determine the interest in viewers engaging and consuming their content in non-traditional ways. I look forward to the report that rubber stamps what we’ve known for quite some time: online video consumption, live and otherwise, is replacing televisions in homes across America.

Update: as noted frequently in comments, Hulu is not powered by Silverlight but Flash.

Update 2: So Silverlight was seen as a huge fail and NBC has gone with Flash for their SNF coverage.

Aaron Brazell

Aaron Brazell is a Baltimore, MD-based WordPress developer, a co-founder at WP Engine, WordPress core contributor and author. He wrote the book WordPress Bible and has been publishing on the web since 2000. You can follow him on Twitter, on his personal blog and view his photography at The Aperture Filter.

144 thoughts on “NBC, NFL Deal Puts Adobe One More Step Back

  1. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  2. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  3. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  4. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  5. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  6. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  7. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  8. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  9. Wow.. I wonder if you have done any research before publshing this article.I have worked with Hulu and it does not have any technology remotely related to Silverlight. In fact Hulu is the best and foremost example of the use of Flash Video streaming technology using Flash Media Server ( as opposed to free flash progressive download) and one that silences the critics questioning the ability of Flash video supporting feature length videos.

  10. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  11. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  12. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  13. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  14. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  15. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  16. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  17. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

  18. Aaron, you do yourself and your site a gross disservice when you write up speculation as fact: “Which platform is poised to leverage this astonishing about-turn from NFL press mongers? You got it… Silverlight.” This is not worded as speculative (neither, by the way, is the headline; the magic word would be “may”).As other commenters have mentioned, Hulu is built with Flash, and it would’ve taken you under five seconds to determine that; furthermore, your ignorance of this basic info about a top-10 video site in the first place detracts from your claim to social media expertise.However, actually determining that would have detracted from the storyline the article pushes – that NBC will use SilverLight for NFL because they already are using it for Hulu and the Olympics.For one thing, it certainly makes the following graf inoperative:”Why would NBC invoke any other technology than Silverlight to render rich media content over the web when the technology is quite possibly powering Hulu-powered television and quite possibly about to be a rousing success at the Olympics.”For another, it makes your headline entirely unsupported at best and grossly inaccurate at worst.

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