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WordPress 3.0 Preview Webinar

Yesterday, the iThemes folks graciously hosted me for a webinar. I had the opportunity to demonstrate some of the more anticipated features of WordPress 3.0 (due out next month). In the process, I also expressed some of the philosophies in the WordPress community around contributing and shaping the most popular publishing platform on the web.

Some of my answers to questions late in the webinar are directed specifically toward the fringe elements of the community who approach the project from a combative perspective choosing to take pot shots at people and Automattic specifically while never doing a damn thing to push the platform forward. While I’ve left names out of the webinar and this post, the message is clear: if you want to have credibility in the community, learn how to be constructive and own the features and elements you want to see.

But the webinar was not a political statement. In fact, most of it was a hands on demonstration of the new twentyten default theme in WordPress 3.0, the custom taxonomy and post type features which bring WordPress into approximate parity with other content management systems, as well as a preview of “The Merge” – the combination of WordPress MU and WordPress.

Thanks again to the folks over at iThemes. If you missed the Webinar, here it is. Sorry, iPhone and iPad users…. it’s Flash. ;)

WordPress 3.0 Preview with Aaron Brazell from WebDesign.com on Vimeo.

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Our lives in a thousand years

A few days ago, I posed a question on Facebook and on Twitter: What will our offspring know about us in a thousand years? It came after a conversation about how what we know about our ancestors has been discovered through archaeology and discovery of physical evidence. We know much about the Egyptians through discovery and exploration of the pyramids, sphinx and pottery. We know what we know about the Roman Empire due to written evidence, scrolls and ruins.

In our digital age of bits and bytes… where tremendous amount of data is stored in non-physical locations (can you say “The Cloud”?), what will be the traceable evidence of our society in a thousand years?

This morning, the Library of Congress announced it was acquiring (weird choice of words as it denotes ownership) the entire archive of tweets sent out via Twitter. Will they print these things out so there are paper copies? How will the digital archives of trillions of little messages  that, individually may be mundane (how many tweets that read similar to: “OMG I <3 bacon!” exist?), be stored in such a way to create a greater texture and context of our society?

Dave Winer, of whom I despise as a person but who has produced some excellent work in the past, has railed on this for some time…. if we own our own content, how will we preserve it when entrusted unilaterally to another service. We send status updates to Facebook without ever thinking about how or where that content will be used in the future. Tweets are sent from mobile devices and the web without ever really considering that, hey, Twitter might sell the rights to this stuff to the Library of Congress…

Not that I feel like there is a problem with this. On the contrary, if anyone is qualified to preserve our generations and society for a thousand years to come, it is the Library of Congress.

For more on this story, check out Read Write Web’s story on the acquisition.

Photo Credit: dhammassociety

Cage Match!

Battle of the Titans: Premium Theme Framework Smackdown

I have provided updates for the problems reported with each theme on their pages in this report. We can provide one update per framework as long as something significant has changed (as in a new release of the theme).

For a few days now, I’ve been looking closely at the four major theme frameworks. There are many premium themes. I, in fact, for the time, am using one from Woo Themes that I’ve modified to fit here. However, there are only four that I see as worthy competitors among the elite theme frameworks.

I will be using affiliate links when referencing all of them just because, if you choose to use any of them based on this article, I don’t mind collecting a commission fee. This does not indicate my endorsement of any of them. In fact, quite the opposite. I expect you’ll find me to be a hard, but objective critic of all of them.

The four theme frameworks: Thesis 1.7, Headway 1.6.1, Genesis 1.1.1, and Builder 2.3.11.

Report Scope and Prism

When I went about gathering data on this post, I heard a lot of back and forth from those in the WordPress community about why they liked or disliked each of these themes. Some of the issues were restrictive licensing that flies in the face of the open society that is WordPress. Other things were lingering effects from the Great Premium Theme Pissing Matches™ of 2008. Still others were about how user-friendly the themes were for users. In this report, I put all of that aside and look strictly from the perspective of infrastructure, data, security and WordPress core feature support.

All metrics that have been taken were created equally via a local installation of WordPress (eliminating network latency), with no plugins installed, 10,000 blog posts and 10,000 pages. The data points were taken in the context of a stress test and may or may not reflect actual usage. However, large scale stress is something to be concerned with for any site that is large or plans to become large. How the server handles database transactions, and file load is an integral part of a long term strategy. Each theme was deployed with no configuration changes beyond default settings provided by the theme. The results are fascinating.

This is a seven page article so click through to each new page to read the analysis of each theme.

Photo by icantcu