Welcome to Thunderdome: Bill Gates and Steve Jobs on stage at the D Conference

When I read that Bill Gates and Steve Jobs were going to be on stage together doing joint appearance at D:All Things Digital, the Mad Max movie came to mind.

My mind kept echoing….”Two men enter. One man leaves. Two men enter. One man leaves.”

Unrehearsed and unscripted? This is rare and should be a memorable event.

This is going to be the ultimate in geek spectator sports and for the entrepreneur’s out there an interesting study in communications styles and how to handle yourself in a tough crowd.

God I hope they stream this for those of us who can’t make it up there.

Source:
Bill and Steve’s Excellent Adventure

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Dealing with Founderitis

I found this interesting definition of Founderitis on Wikipedia:

“The term “founderitis” or “founder’s syndrome” refers to the unhealthy condition that afflicts many companies whose founders maintain a stranglehold on organizational leadership. While many companies owe their success “” and in fact their very existence “” to their founders, those same individuals can create chaos that ultimately leads to the organization’s collapse. The challenge to founding CEOs and boards of directors is to take steps to change conflict and chaos into opportunities for growth.”

I have personally experience this running my own business. I have found some ways to avoid it:

– Respect the need for planning activities, staff meetings, and administrative policies;

– Realize that as the company grows circumstances may dictate new approaches;

– Institute new systems with approval of your board;

– Seeks and accepts input from others in making decisions;

– Delegate, Delegate, Delegate
Managing through a fit of founderitis requires a tricky mixture of growth opportunities, board involvement, and a firm delivery method.

  • Accept the fact that you can’t do everything themselves and you need to bring on people whose strengths complement your own.
  • Separation of your identity and goals from your role as a founder.
  • Accept that the organization’s success no longer depends solely on your creativity and decisions but instead requires the input of partners who are equally or perhaps more skilled than you.
  • Dance.
  • Shift responsibilities to worthy successors and trust them to fail and succeed.

Don’t worry if you can’t over come this there is a simple solution. Get your board to hire a professional CEO and take a long vacation.

So how many of you have had problems with founderitis? What is your story? Have a great example to share? Let the comments be the conversation.