I Will Not Be Your Twitter Whore

There’s a lot of uptake on Twitter in recent months. The service that allows folks to tell the world what they are doing in 140 charachters or less has become the new playground of marketing types looking for the next big thing. Now let me say that I love Twitter. I love finding out what my Twitter friends are up to whether it’s a new aspirations or what they really think about a topic.

The great thing about Tweets like this is that it makes you feel like you know the person on the other hand. It’s a vast global playground where people are swinging on swings and sliding down slides and just having fun. They are having conversation.

We had this big global conversation a few years back when marketers were trying to figure out how to leverage this new blogging fad. It was so raw and real, and folks were transparent. It challenged traditional PR types to think differently. The problem is that these same PR folks may have learned about blogging but instantly regress to old habits in other forms of Web 2.0.

In the end, the conversation is still the important thing.

Lately, Twitter marketers have taken to using this global instant messaging service to promote their products, their political candidates, their new service without much thought to those of us who were on the ground floor of Twitter (defined here as pre-SXSW ’07) and using it for it’s purpose.

Robert Scoble said somewhere that he loved Twitter because it was where he could have a window into the minds of early adopters. And this is true. In the end though, traditional marketing types have failed to realize that it’s not the tool that matters. Use a blog, use Twitter, use MySpace. I don’t care! The tool matters not. What matters is the conversation.

Treating my time and my focus as a cheap trick is not winning me over to your thing. I don’t care if John Edwards is using Twitter. I will not come to your event if I have to see it promoted on Twitter. Period. End of story. I am not your whore. If you want my trime, at least buy me a drink and lets spend some quality time first.

You may use Web 2.0 tools, but Web 2.0 is not the answer to marketing. Conversations and relationships are. Use Twitter for what it was intended.

HP Victory: One Small Step for Bloggers, One Giant Leap for the Blogosphere

The other day I posted about a friend, Thomas, who was caught in a customer service nightmare with HP. I won’t rehash the story as it was told here. In fact, I can tell you that much information was omitted (mostly inadvertently) and I don’t regret the story going to the front page of Digg at all. Sure, the Diggers were horrible in their behavior and I’m making a week out of that topic alone. However, I knew that that would probably happen going in as I watched the Digg numbers climb to the promotion threshold.

However, the point was to get eyeballs at HP and we did. Digg was the means to the end and though it was hard, there was no better way of making sure HP saw the story.

Recapping the story, Thomas misinterpreted the ship date on his HP laptop and did not realize the computer would be shipped on February 28 (today). This set him back but he figured that he could have HP change the shipping method to overnight in order to get the computer before he headed out of town on Monday. In communicating this wish, HP did not in any way accommodate him and in fact, threw up walls to push him off to other departments and representatives.

I made a big deal about that kind of behavior on this blog. To me, customer service does not always say that the customer is always right, but does work with the customer to find a tack that will please, primarily the customer, but also the service provider. In this process, that did not happen.
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