Technosailor.com Review and Disclosure Policy

At Technosailor.com, we rarely do product or software reviews. Instead, it’s all about the actual benefit that comes to the business owner or entrepreneur from the product or service. Usually, it takes time for benefits or problems to come out. Though I am personally an early adopter of many technologies, I limit the number of reviews I actually do to the technologies that are going to significantly positively affect a company. Rarely do I go out of the way to get a review copy of anything.

Last week, I was invited by Sprint to attend the Washington, D.C. pre-launch event for the Palm Prē, the new smartphone that is supposed to be an iPhone killer. In advance, I asked for a review unit. It is difficult to know what the significance of a product is in the store. I need to use it for a period of time. I was not allowed to take a Prē home and that is fine. I am on a list and may get an opportunity down the road.

The conversation that night was around what kind of review I’d provide of the unit. Sprint never asked for a positive review but assumed I would provide a review and only wanted fairness out of me. I explained that in my role as a “signal filter”, I would not guarantee a review but I wouldn’t write a negative review. If it’s not a good product, then my audience does not need to even hear about it. The only reason they need to hear about a product is if the product is going to help them run their businesses better. For instance, if I agree to review Peet’s Coffee and they send me 6 half pound bags of different beans, I’m going to love the product. Big fan of Peets. But I’m not posting a review, positive or negative, on this site.

However, as a product that seems to perfectly straddle the world between the iPhone, the best consumer phone, and BlackBerry, the best business phone – the PrÄ“ is likely to get airtime somehow. It’s relevant. Reviews should always be relevant and not simply required.

Tangentially, the PrÄ“ and the “review copy” problem reared it’s ugly head between Techcrunch’s Mike Arrington and TWiT.tv’s Leo Laporte over the weekend.

I think it’s important for anyone who does product reviews of any kind to aggressively protect their ethical priorities. Make your disclosure policy overt and out there (as I am doing here). Let there be no opportunity for question. Reviews can be productive when they are disclosed, relevant to the audience (not simply relevant to your wallet if you do paid reviews) and handled with the utmost of caution. Failure to protect your integrity on this delicate issue can cause you to lose all credibility.

Keep it in mind.

Indiana Jones

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to see Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, the first Indiana Jones move in 19 years. I make no promises about spoilers, but will attempt to avoid giving the story away.

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The opening scene was the hook to get Indiana Jones loves back into the action. Indy is now quite a bit older and the setting is many years later in the heart of the Red Scare. The enemy is no longer Nazi Germany, but the Soviet Union.

Indiana Jones survives a missile range speed acceleration testing track, loads of highly trained Russian Red Army with a strange inability to hit targets with their guns, three drops over Niagara Falls-size waterfalls and the collapse of yet another temple.

The requirement for the suspension of all belief aside, it was a pretty good movie. Definite popcorn flick. 3.5 Stars which isn’t bad for a Lucasfilm comeback.

Easter Eggs include: The Ark of the Covenant, Area 51, Shia LaBeouf nearly putting the Indiana Jones hat on his head, the Death Star drawn on a wall and a few more that I might have missed.

It was classic Indiana Jones. Historical plot woven with supernatural thread. Very enjoyable, but not at all believable.