Science is King

I’m a scientist.

I don’t have a degree from Stanford or Carnegie Mellon… But I’m a scientist.

I hypothesize, test and prove.

If the result doesn’t meet my supposition, I accept that and move on.

Science required known, provable facts. Or in computer science, constants.

To prove, you need to test. To test, you need constants. You need to know with 100% certainty that the factors in your experiment are known and 100% objectively provable.

Obama isn’t an American, while a supposition, cannot be proven as fact. There are records showing otherwise.

That men are pigs, while an okay assumption, does not rely on provable facts. Any proof relies on subjective experience.

That WordPress is the best CMS on the planet? While it may control ~20% of the web, assumes that 20% thinks its the right choice and avoids supporting evidence toward other CMSes.

I can get more explicit about suppositions assumed as fact, but you get the idea.

Work with what you know. Make assumptions but allow yourself to be wrong. Data is the only thing that matters.

Twitter Terminal Velocity

Terminal Velocity is defined by physicists as the maximum speed that an object of a given mass can achieve when accelerating toward another object with a gravitational constant. Skydivers can only accelerate to a certain speed before maxing out at a terminal velocity.

For the geeky science type among us, the formula is for determining Terminal Velocity is here.

There is a Terminal Velocity with Twitter as well. I have, at the time of this writing, I have 1,293 followers on Twitter. That’s 1,293 people who I see tweets from. If my calculations are correct, I see approximately 10 tweets per minute. That’s 600 tweets per hour or 14,400 tweets per day. That’s a hell of a lot of Tweets.

Here’s my non-scientfic law, though. The tweet stream reached terminal velocity somewhere back around 500 followers when I also received approximately 10 tweets per minute. There are variables, of course, that play in to the tweet stream – mostly due to the Twitter infrastructure. For one, Twitter can only deliver a certain number of Tweets per second anyway. Secondly, the human factor plays in. How quickly do people read and respond to my tweets? How quickly do my tweets get delivered to them? In the end, the Tweet stream moves as quick at 1,293 followers as it did at 500. Titter terminal velocity.

So how do I deal with 14,400 tweets per day, you might ask? (I know you might ask because you ask all the time when I meet you). Simply, I don’t read everything. I read all the @ replies directed toward me. I read all the direct messages. I really only read everything whenever I sit down to actively engage in Twitter (which might happen once or twice a day for 30 mins at a time). It’s really the only way I can deal with the flow.