Looking for a Top Notch WordPress/PHP Developer

If you’re in Baltimore and are a developer, or if you are in Baltimore and know someone who is a developer… Heck, if you’re in DC and are a developer or know a developer, we need you. (You can be to work in under an hour on the MARC train).

Some of you know what I do and who I do it for. I work for a company that has consistently been rated in the top 3 companies to work for. We’re fun and relaxed and our content producers focus on publishing in the financial industry.

Dogs are regularly in the office. We wear shorts and sandals to work. It’s an a-political group – as in office politics. Everyone works well together from the execs down to customer service.

We believe in “Fail cheap and quick” as a lean startup sort of mentality and everyone is empowered to just try stuff if it makes sense.

What *I* do is build awesome web technology to support the business. Plenty of WordPress but now we’re building out huge APIs for reporting and consumer-facing tools. And that’s not WordPress. That’s Laravel and MVC, if you’re curious.

We are looking to add another developer with real chops. PHP, JS, REST APIs, SQL for now with NoSQL as a viable thing for the future. We largely operate on Rackspace and Amazon EC2.

I’d love to hear from you or your developer friend. Send me your resume and cover letter but let me see your github as well!

abrazell@agorafinancial.com

WordPress Hacking and Cleanup

There’s a brute force attack underway on a global scale. Massive. The attack vector? Keep attempting user/pass combos in an automated way until a breakin happens.

If your WordPress site gets hacked, I am available for cleanup and an audit.

Aaron@technosailor.com

It absolutely will cost you a minor fortune. That’s the way it goes. Don’t complain or whine, just get your credit card out.

It would be cheaper to have a strong password and install a plugin that limits failed login attempts though.

But if you don’t, rest assured I can help you despite you having to postpone a vacation in St. Thomas.

Do the right thing.

TwentyThirteen

As WordPress 3.6 goes to beta, it’s awesome the way the new default theme, TwentyThirteen (that I’m using on this site), handles a variety of post formats.

TUTORIAL: Developing Locally on WordPress with Remote Database Over SSH

Today, I went about setting up a local WordPress install for some development I am doing at work. The problem that existed is that I didn’t want to bring the database from the existing development server site into my local MySQL instance. It’s far too big. I figured this could be done via an SSH tunnel and so, I set abut trying to figure it out. The situation worked flawlessly and so, for your sake (and for myself for the future), I give you the steps.

Setting up the SSH Tunnel

I run a local MySQL server and that runs on the standard MySQL port 3306. So as these things go, I can’t bind anything else to port 3306 locally. I have to use an alternate port number. I chose 5555, but you can use whatever you want.

The command to run in a Terminal window is:

ssh -N -L 5555:127.0.0.1:3306 remoteuser@remotedomain.com -vv

A little bit about what this means.

the -N flag means that when connecting via SSH, we are not going to execute any commands. This is necessary for tunnelling as, we literally, will not execute any commands on the remote server. Therefore, we won’t get a command prompt.

the -L flag tells SSH that we are going to port forward. The following portion, 5555:127.0.0.1:3306 combined with the -L flag means, literally, forward all traffic on localhost (127.0.0.1) connecting on port 5555 to the remote server’s port 3306 (standard MySQL listening port).

The remote server and ssh connection is handled by remoteuser@remotedomain.com. This seems obvious, but just in case. You may be prompted to enter your SSH password.

The final part can be omitted, but I like to keep it there so I know what’s happening. The -vv flag tells the SSH daemon to be extra verbose about what is happening with the connection. It’s sort of a good way to debug if you need to, and to know that the port forwarding is actually taking place.

Configuring WordPress to use the Tunnel

Now that we have a successful SSH tunnel, you have to configure WordPress to use it. In the wp-config.php file, simply modify the DB_HOST constant to read:

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define( 'DB_HOST', '127.0.0.1:5555' );

You need to add two more variables, though, to override WordPress’ existing siteurl and home options to allow you to work with the localhost domain, instead of redirecting to the remotedomain.com that is configured in WordPress.

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define( 'WP_HOME', 'http://localhost' );

define( 'WP_SITEURL', 'http://localhost' );

BOOM!

With these configurations in place, loading up WordPress should now load in the database content from the remote host and you can get to work on local development. Word to the wise… don’t close the terminal window with the tunnel or the tunnel will be severed. If you have to minimize it so it’s not annoying you, go for it… just don’t close it.

Contest: 3 free copies of the WordPress Bible [UPDATE]

Today marked the drop of WordPress 3.5 and I want to celebrate.

Tomorrow, I’m going to give away three autographed copies of the WordPress Bible. You have to be on Twitter. I apologize to those who have chosen to abandon Twitter, or have chosen not to participate, but it is the defacto communications medium of the 21st century and how I operate.

The book is a mix of advanced and beginner content. Therefore, I will do trivia. Trivia will have a beginner round, an advanced round and an intermediate round. All WordPress oriented. The winner is in my sole discretion and you will be required to provide your mailing address if you are selected.

WordPress core contributors are not allowed to participate in the beginner or intermediate round. If your name is on “the list” of 3.5 contributors, you cannot win those rounds. You can, however, participate in the advanced round.

The beginner round will consist of questions surrounding theme and plugin management with possible questions around usability and interface.

The advanced round (the only round open to core contributors) will be based on WordPress APIs, hooks and advanced WordPress development.

The intermediate round will mix both but the developer-oriented questions will be more common and basic and user questions will be more difficult.

You must hashtag your answers with #wpbibletrivia. Failure to do so disqualifies you for an answer.

The first answer I see that is correct is a correct answer. My judgement solely.

There will be 10 questions per round so pay attention.

The beginner round begins at 11am Central Time.

Share this on Facebook, Twitter or whatever your social media channel of choice is. The questions will be asked on my Twitter feed: @technosailor.

Good luck!

Update

The winners of the trivia contest were David Peralty for the beginner round, Kim Parsell for the intermediate round and Kailey Lampert for the Advance round. Well done, everyone!