Changing Roles at WP Engine

For some time, I’ve felt there was a change coming and today, I’m ready to announce that my role within WP Engine is changing. Starting today, I have transitioned into an advisory and consulting role with the company.

Effective immediately, I will be taking the portion of the business that focused on professional services and consulting to allow the company to focus on premiere WordPress hosting. It’s a good thing and I’m excited about the possibilities. Back in November, we decided to start taking on some professional services work to augment demands from many of our customers. It was awesome to have fast, secure, scaleable, managed hosting but they wanted more!

And we wanted more.

However, as the company has evolved, taken funding, hired more people, addressed growth challenges and built out our hosting option, it seemed clear that the professional services portion of the company was a separate kind of deal than what we wanted to focus on.

So today, I’ll be taking that portion of the company (and all related existing and current relationships, as agreed on), and working on that. Meanwhile, I’ll still be working with the company to guide direction and strategy. So it’s good for everyone.

Effective immediately, I am available for all WordPress consulting roles. However, I am also currently entertaining all possibilities involving full time employment as well, and welcome those conversations.

To contact me, please direct emails to aaron@technosailor.com. As transitions go, the immediate financial impact is something that I need to consider.

The WordPress Bible

The WordPress Bible is the guide you need for all levels of skill and expertise in WordPress. If you’re just beginning, I give you tricks and tips on how to make use of the WordPress administrative interface, how to install and configure plugins, themes and widgets.

If you’re a theme developer, I give you insight into the variety of template tags, theme hooks and best practices for building a theme that will wow your readers.

For plugin developers, the many APIs and classes that WordPress has to offer are at your fingertips.

The most popular open source Content Management System on the internet!

As of late 2014, WordPress powers over 20% of the internet. Put another way, one out of every five websites you visit on the internet is likely built using WordPress in one way or another. As of this update, WordPress 4.1 1 has been downloaded over 14.1 million times.

There’s a reason why this book was written for you. Don’t get left behind.

(And if you catch me out and about and own the book, I’ll gladly sign it for you!)

Purchase it today!

Notes:

  1. The WordPress Bible was last revised for WordPress 3.1, but almost everything in it still applies