Untraceable: Light on plot; Heavy on message

Last night, my wife and I decided to go check out the new movie Untraceable starring Diane Lane. We both believe we got our money’s worth.

Spoiler to follow.

The plot was a bit weak and worn out. The FBI cybercrime division do their cyber warfare bit on Windows Vista machines, for one, which makes it somewhat laughable. :-) Putting that aside, the plot follows a serial killer through a tired progression of increasingly sensational murders, with an internet twist. The more traffic that visits the site with live streaming of a victim, the quicker the victim dies.

“We are the murder weapon” was the chilling verdict from the FBI in a national press conference that only served to drive traffic harder and faster to the website as viewers and chat room participants engaged gleefully in the torture and subsequent deaths.

The plot continues to an expected climax where the star of the movie, Diane Lane playing Agent Jennifer Marsh, becomes the last of the killer’s victims. Every step of the way, the next twists were predictable, yet still very interesting and gripping.

Though the plot was tired and overdone (something right out of Criminal Minds, actually), the message was clearly aimed at the YouTube generation of young, tech savvy internet users who are comfortable in a world of little human contact. Images on a screen are something to be entertained by, much like the television generation could sit down and watch Rambo or Die Hard and walk away laughing.

Don’t get me wrong. I am the YouTube generation. I watched this video, shortly before leaving for the theatre (which incidentally is hilarious). Guilty as charged.

The point is, the movie does a good job of sending the message. We got the memo. The plots weakness was balanced out by the well executed delivery.

3.5 stars.

Pachelbel

I found this via Facebook. One of my friends sent this to me and I laughed so hard I watched it 3 times in a row. See, if you’re a musician as I am, you know that music is just a bunch of patterns. It’s mathematical, really. So it’s not all that unusual for “progressions” to repeat or be duplicated between songs. It’s unintentional mostly, but thats the nature of patterns.

Apparently, everyone loves the Canon in D patterns. ;-)