The Internet is About to Become WAY Faster

Earlier this week, the big news in the tech space surrounded the completion of the HTTP/2 Spec.

Gibberish, gibberish, gibberish.

What does this mean for the internet? The short version is: it’s about to become way faster.

Faster is extremely important if you want to make money from traffic to your site. Or, you know, if you use the internet at all. No one wants to wait for a website that just sits there and spins while it’s trying to load. We all hate that. And importantly, Google hates that.

Several years ago, Google invented and implemented the SPDY protocol. Simply, SPDY allows for the compression and efficient transmission of requests between browser and server. I’ll get into the technical details later, but for the sake of summarizing why the Internet is about to get faster… Google’s SPDY technology is the cornerstone of HTTP/2.

Now that the spec is finalized, it goes to editorial for cleanup and publishing… but the nuts and bolts of the spec will not change going forward. That means browsers and servers can start rolling out these changes as soon as… today.

Technical explanation

If you are not interested in the technical explanation for HTTP/2, please skip to the next section. I don’t want you falling asleep and drooling on your keyboard.

In the original days of the internet, there was the HTTP/1.0 spec. This spec defined how clients (browsers) and servers communicated over a network. We still use 1.0 quite a bit today, though 1.1 is the current preferred.

When it comes to HTTP, the concept is simple… a client requests a resource (image, html, mp3, whatever) from a server, the web server interprets the request, goes back into a storage closet, finds the resource, has the requestor sign for it and then sends the resource on it’s way back to the client. A simple understanding is….

BROWSER: “Hey, server… can I get that image named image.jpg? You should find it in this folder.”

SERVER: “Sure, let me go look. Oh, here it is. There you go”

BROWSER: “Thanks, dude”

If the server can’t find the image in the directory, it sends the client a 404 (Not Found), but that’s just a sidenote.

HTTP/1.0’s Problem

The problem with HTTP/1.0 however, was that it only allowed for a single request on a single connection to the server. To put it in another way, The web page has 10 images on it. In order to get those 10 images from the server, it would have to send 10 requests. That creates a lot of requests for the server and if the server wasn’t optimized for that kind of capacity, it could crash… or at least be in the weeds. It was bad all around for bandwidth as well. All of those requests add up to high bandwidth costs!

So God gave us HTTP/1.1.

HTTP/1.1’s Problem

Given this inherent problem with HTTP/1.0, HTTP/1.1 enhanced the original spec by adding the concept of pipelining. Imagine, if you will, a highway tunnel. Generally, there’s no passing in a tunnel. While HTTP/1.0 only allowed a single car through the tunnel at a time, HTTP/1.1 allowed multiple cars in the tunnel, but dictated no passing. And because the web server on the other end of the tunnel can only process requests as they come in, you end up with a stacked up queue of requests waiting to get processed and… you still have the same problem where the server gets in the weeds and slows down.

In both the case of 1.0 and 1.1, server technology evolved to allow concurrency of requests. This gave us multiple lanes in the tunnel, but 1.1 still dictated no passing. So requests in one lane, had to stay in that lane but there could be more than one lane which allowed us to bandaid the inherent weakness in the HTTP/1.x stack.

Enter HTTP/2

When Google started giving SEO benefits to sites based on speed, they also ate their own dog food and invented SPDY. SPDY allows for compression of resources in a much more efficient way if both server and client supported it. It also allowed for single requests to get many resources at a time. That page that had 10 images and had to make 10 requests for those 10 images could now make a single request to get all 10 images at once. Efficiency, I tell you.

As with any working group, the task force that put together HTTP/2 had representation from Google. Google, as a good citizen, shared it’s knowledge and spec for SPDY with the working group and it became the basis of HTTP/2. In fact, Google will now eliminate SPDY in favor of HTTP/2.

In fact, clients are supporting HTTP/2 now. Well, a lot of them are anyway… and that’s because of Google’s implementation of SPDY. Internet Explorer 11+, Firefox 36+, and Chrome all implement SPDY-HTTP/2 support, but none are currently enabled by default. Safari and Mobile Safari will likely soon get the support.

Most web servers also implement SPDY-HTTP/2 with the exception of lighttpd.

What does it mean to me?

The new HTTP spec is probably not anything you need to worry about at this point. System administrators will want to make sure their web servers are up to date and their TLS certificates are upgraded. Though the working group does not require HTTP/2 to use TLS, I’d expect most server manufacturer’s to require them in their own implementation… for security reasons.

On the client side, HTTP/1.1 still works. The working group was very careful to ensure backwards compatibility with prior versions of the spec. So if your browser makes a 1.1 request to a 2.0 server, the server will still answer in 1.1 with the same limitations I described above.

As developers, we will most likely want to use 2.0 when we can. The finalization of the spec is so new that it remains unclear what that means yet. For instance, what does this mean for the WordPress WP_Http class? Probably nothing in the short terms, but I’d expect enhancements to start rolling in as optional “toys” for developers.

Are you a developer or engineer? What are your thoughts on the new spec?

Public Enemy Number 1 for A Small Development Shop

Net-30, Net-45, Net-60.

If you’ve been working as a freelancer or run your own development shop, you’re familiar with these terms. They are the terms that many businesses leverage for paying invoices. They exist because of Accounts Payable.

What these terms mean is from the day you issue a client an invoice, they will pay it in 30, 45 or 60 days.

Seems normal, right?

For small businesses, one man shops, freelancer… this is hell dressed up as heaven for the client. You get to do the work and sometime in the future they pay you.

As a small business owner, you have much tighter margins than clients who are bigger organizations and let’s be really blunt… the system wasn’t built for you. It was built for them. They hold all the cards and you get to operate at their whim.

Sucky life and a sucky way to build a business, right?

It serves your client’s Accounts Payable department but it’s anti-competitive. Bigger organizations can go “at risk” and eat costs up front. You? You cannot. You have to pay your employees. You have to incur operating costs that should be paid for.

What’s more, many companies won’t pay for code until they receive it… and then Net-30, Net-45, Net-60.

In almost all cases, as an independent, I structure deals with a deposit (another thing other companies don’t want to pay) and with stipulation that code is delivered upon receipt of payment. It’s my insurance policy against clients who would run with my intellectual property (it’s happened quite a bit in the past!).

As an independent, I almost always reject Net-30, Net-45, Net-60 terms. It does not work for me, and if you’re an independent or a small business owner… it probably doesn’t work for you either. So stop playing that game. Just say no. They will stomp their feet. Sometimes you won’t get the business. But when you do get business, you will be paid promptly for the work you did and the playing field will be leveled.

Weekly Blog Post Challenge

Back in 2004, I, like many other people in the WordPress community began blogging. We didn’t, I don’t think, get into WordPress because we wanted to write code or build a career. We got into it because we wanted to write. Our natural talent and curiosity took over, however, and we began writing code.

At some point, I broke this blog apart into other blogs… a personal blog, a photoblog, a sports blog, etc. All of these are spread around and in various forms of repair or disrepair.

I have nearly 1k posts here, down from 2k a few years ago when I did a purge. But I’ve only written 12 since January of 2013. TWELVE. Sadly, life takes over and work takes over and, at least for me, the artificial silos of “this blog is for professional writing, this one is for personal writing” and so on has kept me from deciding… I want to write again.

As Twitter became ubiquitous, most of my professional interactions began happening over there. Instead of my photoblog, I’ve leaned more on Flickr and Instagram. All of this has left my blogging in a sad state of disrepair.

My friends and colleagues, Brad Williams and Dre Armeda, have realized that they really want to get back to what they love doing and that’s writing more. Brad has committed to writing 100 posts in 2018 (a goal that is ludicrous for me).

Dre has begun a Facebook group (feel free to join if you plan on joining us in this exercise!) where members can encourage each other and share their content. Not everyone is committing to 100 posts. For me, I’m committing to one post per week.

I suppose now is a good time to explain that the invite to join me in this exercise does not mean you have to write about WordPress, or for that matter, any topic whatsoever. If you want to pick a topic (law, science, dating, oncology!!!), feel free. Or talk about any multitude of topics. But the exercise is more about the therapeutic exercise of writing and not so much about what you’re writing about. And it’s to give you (and me!) peers to keep us going forward.

This does count as the first post of this new commitment. I’ll have another one next week.

As part of this whole reboot, personally, I plan to consolidate my various blogs into this one. Since my online name is technosailor, it seems appropriate that should be the hub for everything else.

I’ll also be building a new theme that will accommodate all of this merged content and, frankly, WordPress has come far enough since I was blogging regularly, that it’s completely likely I can leverage new forms of content that I didn’t have access to before.

Anyways, I’m off track. Please do join me in this experiment. It will be fun!

My process for Photography Production

I’ve shared a lot of my photography via social networks – Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flickr. It’s generally unlike other photography that you may see around the web. I generally don’t shoot people, unless the people are part of a greater narrative or scene. Never as the object of focus in the scene. I also have embraced the surreal… more commonly known as High Dynamic Range (or HDR) photography. You either love it or you hate it. You can see some of those on Flickr.

Last night, I was showing this picture to a friend who exclaimed, “How the hell do you do this?”… and while he is no photographer, I have had that question enough to answer that question here. Take this as a tutorial.

HDR Beach Rainbow-small

I will take you through the steps of processing a photo using my workflow. Photography is an art, though, and while the steps I use achieve the aesthetics I am comfortable with, you should absolutely tinker and play. You never get any better if you don’t. And obviously, know your camera… know how to see a shot. Composition is important and I don’t think it can really be taught… it’s an innate sense that you get simply by using your camera and practicing!


Obviously, you have to start with a camera. In the photo I am processing here, I am shooting with a Canon T5i and an EF 28-135mm f/3.6L lens. I’m shooting in Aperture priority mode with autofocus turned on. What this means, in laymans terms, is that I have a wide lens (28-135mm… it’s a zoom but the lower the number, the wider the field of view), with a middle of the road aperture (aperture is how wide your lens opens up when you snap a photo… the lower the number, the more light and the less depth of field). It’s also important to shoot RAW, as RAW captures much more image data than JPEG and allows for manipulation in software like Lightrooom.

Note: Shutter Speed is how fast the shutter opens and is, as it sounds, a time thing. Aperture is how wide your shutter opens… the wider (or lower number), the more light and the shallower the depth of field is brought in. ISO is your light sensitivity. Use this in combination with Aperture to enhance the exposure of light. A lower ISO means more exposure. A higher number represents less exposure (and more noise…. fine grained splotchiness… in the image). They are all important to know and use appropriately.

This is the photo of my fur kid on Christmas Day. We will be developing this.

Lightroom Processing

I import all my photos into Lightroom. Once I’m there, I have access to all kinds of non-destructive settings and if I shoot RAW (which I do), all the visual data, including visual information you can’t see… shadows, highlights… they are all there waiting to be drawn out.

In Lightroom, I have a few steps. I want to setup my key image (the image that we’ll do all other processing from, with the enhancements I’d like. In Lightroom, visit the Develop tab and work from the top of your toolbox to the bottom. The toolbox is on the right.
The initial list of settings I make on this photograph (and usually the settings I tinker with) are as such:

  • Contrast: +40
  • Highlights: +20
  • Shadows: +89
  • Whites: +30
  • Blacks: No change
  • Luminence: 86 – Luminence is important for noise reduction. See this great article on noise reduction


Exposure is saved for the next step. Technically, HDR is a style of photography that superimposes several images of different exposures over each other. You can do this with a camera if you have a tripod and the scene does not change between snapping photos and adjusting camera exposures. This is not practical in an action shot or where there is any movement. It’s easier to take one exposure and copy it and apply your exposure changes.

In the next step, I right click on the image in the filmstrip (bottom of the Lightroom view) and choose “Create Virtual Copy”. I do that twice so, at the end, I have three equal images. I leave the original alone and adjust the second image exposure level to +2. For the third, I set it to -2. Now I have three exact photos with 3 different exposure levels. If you do adjust your exposure in the first image, then do the math to make exposure 2 as +2 from that number and the third as -2 from the original.

For example, if you modify the exposure in the original to +.50 and then create two virtual copies, your second copy should be +2.50 and the third should be -1.50.

Export these photos to somewhere you can find them.


Now, open Photomatix! Click on “Load Bracketed Photos” and find your three exposure-doctored photos.

Make sure that your exposure brackets are set correctly.

After clicking “Ok”, you can modify the settings as necessary, but I typically leave them alone. When finished, click “Align and merge to HDR”. If you shoot three (or more) photos from your camera, there is a chance that the three images are slightly unaligned. Photomatix tries to fix this. Because I use one exposure and enhance the exposure on copies, this is mainly unnecessary.

Photomatix will apply your images on top of each other and will smartly attempt to find the best aspects of each to show and enhance. Photomatix comes with boatloads of presets and you can find more in abundance on the internet. I use Trey’s, but often tweak his presets myself using the toolbar on the left.

Once you find the settings you like, click the “Apply” button…

Save it and open it up in an application like Photograph to apply a very small crop to remove the white space that always exists as an orphan of this process.

Once you’ve done this, you’re done. I do other things such as making smaller sizes for the web. I also use Lightroom’s Watermark feature on export to apply my signature. Combat stealing anywhere I can. Photography, however, is an art. Find your art and your expression. Use these tools or others. There’s no right way to do anything, outside of fundamentals. Experiment and have fun!

Here’s the final product!

HDR Fender

Depression:What it Means

As everyone has most likely heard now, Robin Williams has died. Police have now come out and said he hung himself.

Not too long ago, Phillip Seymour Hoffman overdosed on a cocktail of heroin, cocaine and amphetamine, used to treat ADHD. That overdose resulted in his untimely death.

These incidents, naturally, shake our culture to it’s core. Both deaths came as a surprise to most, but they shouldn’t have. Both had a history of substance abuse in conjunction with severe depression.

Depression is not a feeling. It is a chemical and medical condition. It is, in fact, an illness. It also carries a stigma.

In a separate set of circumstances in relation to alcoholism, a person pointed out to me that when you go to the hospital with chest pains, and it is determined that you have a coronary, no one is lining up at the door to tell that person that the person has done something wrong or that they have to clean up their act. Yet with alcoholism (and depression), everyone seems to be an expert.

It’s no wonder that these cases go untreated and that the person suffering feels the need to contain their symptoms.

I know. I deal with constant depression.

Let me explain that more, because some reading this will automatically think that makes me suicidal. I want to be clear what depression is and what it is not. Robin Williams passing has, as Phillip Seymour Hoffman’s overdose did, created an atmosphere, if only briefly, where our society looks within itself to try to understand. This, unfortunately, will pass within a week or so. That’s why this article, and others like it right now, are critical. They help us understand. Hopefully, it compels us to action. Hopefully, it captures our imagination and makes us a better society.

Depression can be crippling. There have been days where I have sat frozen, unable to move… unable to decide… unable to take any action. It’s terrifying. This is not most days, but it is some.

It is often bi-polar… the term, itself carrying a stigma that is unfair. In one moment, you live in a euphoric moment (without substances!). Nothing can stop you. You’re on top of the world. You are the victor. In the next moment, you are a scared child, huddling in your home, unable to move or talk to other people. You are grouchy and removed. When your significant other asks what you’re thinking for dinner, you can’t answer or even think.

On your best day, you are truly at your best. You’re the class clown or the creative genius. Your mind doesn’t stop. You are constantly evaluating your life, your friends, your life and what you want to achieve. At your worst, you feel unsafe, insecure, scared, paralyzed.

Traditional approaches, when your friend is suffering, is to tell them to suck it up. As if that’s a mechanical task that can somehow be done without mental interaction. As if it’s a light switch to simply be flipped. You see, when you are not paralyzed with this illness, you are not confined to the chains that bind us. In other words, it’s easier said than done.

That’s not your fault. You just don’t understand.

Some of the greatest minds in history, not to mention many of the not-so-great minds, have suffered with depression. Some mild. Many severe. In most cases, depression is not something that is dealt with every waking hour of every day. Often, someone who is depressed can go days, weeks or even months without any manifestation. Others can’t get out of bed.

Ludwig Boltzmann is a name you may not have heard of, but in the middle and later part of the 1800s, this man was peddling controversial scientific ideas that we know to be true today. For instance, he was the guy who pushed the idea that molecules, the smallest building block of the universe known to scientists of the day, were actually made of smaller building blocks – atoms. His work in the area of mass and atomic mechanics paved the way for some of the greatest inventions and advances in human history.

Some of his ideas, of course, are not proven and remain controversial. One of these was the idea that, like a deck of cards sufficiently shuffled enough times, the probability of the deck returning to it’s ordered state exists. This flies in the face of the accepted 2nd Law of Thermodynamics which states, in summary, that entropy is the process of every matter dissolving over time into disorder.

He hung himself on September 5, 1906 after a lifetime of combat with fellow physicists and mathematicians. He suffered from bipolar disorder.

The point of this? Throughout our society, people who are top of their game, who live in the spotlight, who invent things, make things… or don’t… they are great family people, they volunteer at their local church, they spend weekends coaching little league… these are the unseen victims in our midst that no one knows about because… we as a society have told them they can’t be vulnerable, they can’t ask for help, and they cannot be weak.

This is especially true for men, in regards to the last part. We, as men, are taught from a very early age that there is no room for weakness. There is no room for vulnerability. There is no reason why we, as men, should ever rely or ask for help from anyone else.

I am a testament to this.

Please don’t let me, or people like me, go. Don’t ignore us. Don’t assume we’re okay. Text us. Call us. Drag us by our collars and make us sit down at a ballgame, at a restaurant (avoid the bars!) or in another way. Give us the human connection we need but we won’t ask for. Help us. Don’t let us be a victim.

I’m okay talking about this because I’ve reached a point in my life where being vulnerable is something that is difficult, but I can do. I have people around me that I know care about me. When I suffer my depressive episodes, I am exactly as I described earlier. I feel lonely and am withdrawn. I hide (which is hard to do when you live with someone!). I get off the interwebz. I can’t focus. When I’m not, I’m engaged. My wit is sharp. My social acumen is excellent.

Learn the patterns of the people around you and, to quote the TSA, if you see something, say something. Don’t be rude. Don’t be aggressive. Help your friend, your wife, your husband, you friend find their way.

And of course, there are resources for those in need, including the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in the United States is 1-800-273-8255.

Bad Job Board Titles

Human Resources personnel. You gotta love ’em.

They’re the people who make sure you get paid every week, or biweekly or however often you get paid. They’re the ones who you talk to when you have a complaint about another employee. HR personnel are also, generally, responsible for posting job reqs.

If you go to, or Monster, or Career Builder, you’re going to see a whole lot of job postings that, as you scan the titles, start to blur together a bit.

The reason for this is because almost all job postings carry a cliché name based on the fact that generic templates (or more accurately, “loosely specific”) are used and common titles are used. This usually is because the HR person who puts together the job listing is not familiar enough with the minutiae of the specific position as, say, a hiring manager might be.

So you end up with titles like “Web Developer”.

What does it meeeeeeeeeaaaan?

Many of you know that, about three weeks ago, I lost my job to a reorganization at the company I worked for as a WordPress Developer (another loosely specific title). Since that time, I have been talking to a variety of companies that have proactively reached out to me, knowing my reputation and experience in the WordPress world. I have generally avoided the job sites because of the problem described above.

“Web Developer” as a title is misleading, vague and all-encompassingly wrong. Why do you say that, you might ask.

Generally speaking, a web developer job is listed like this:

Acme, Inc. is seeking a driven, highly talented candidate to fill our Web Developer position. In this position, you will demonstrate creativity as you work with others to accommodate our clients needs. Eligible candidates posses intimate knowledge of the following

  • HTML5
  • CSS3
  • jQuery, or similar Javascript framework
  • SASS or LESS
  • Grunt
  • Node
  • AngularJS

Please forward your portfolio to

Etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.

This is, in fact, a valid “web developer” role.

A valid web developer role may also look like this:

Acme, Inc. is seeking a driven, highly talented candidate to fill our Web Developer position. In this position, you will demonstrate problem solving as you design, build, test and deploy a RESTful API and database cluster that can grow as needed. We prefer the candidate has some knowledge of algorithms and scaling. Candidates should possess intimate knowledge of the following:

  • NoSQL
  • MariaDB/MySQL
  • PHP/Python/Ruby
  • Vagrant
  • Agile and/or Scrum development environments
  • Moderate familiarity with Ubuntu or other Linux environment

Please forward your resume and a link to your Github account to

Very similar, and yet very different job listings. Yet they can both be referred to a “Web Developer” jobs, even though one is, more accurately, a “Front End Developer” role and another is “Back End Developer”.

By calling a job a “Web Developer” job, you have people who have only futzed around in Dreamweaver and only consider the user experience or interface looking at positions meant for data architects. And you have folks who know how to stand up an EC2 cluster and build and deploy Django applications with high redundancy and caching layers looking at jobs meant for the people who lose sleep at night over typefaces.

Everyone loses.

The candidate loses the opportunity to find the position she is really looking for because it’s buried under a bad title, or she gets so tired of looking for the real gold in the pile of rocks that she gives up.

The employer loses the opportunity because the signal to noise ratio on applications is terrible. Or, people just get tired of applying for mislabeled jobs.

So please, hiring managers, at least write up your “recommended” job req for HR. You know the job better than anyone. You know who you are looking for. Give it a proper name!

Entrepreneurial Priorities if You Don’t Want to Despise Yourself at Age 80

With the exception of a general, “We’re hiring” post a few days ago, my site has been largely neglected for the past year. It’s not that I don’t want to write. I do. And it’s not like I don’t have things to say because, if you know me, I do. I really do. And it’s not even that what I’d like to say isn’t all that important…. because it generally is.

I feel the need to write today, however, because it directly relates to why I don’t write as much as I used to. And it directly relates to why I, in the eyes of the typical startup founder or venture capitalist, am not a great entrepreneur. In their eyes. I’ll admit that I’m a terrible day to day running a business guy. I’m a terrible “take care of the basics” like health care and witholding taxes” guy. I’m actually a pretty decent entrepreneur though. Put me on the phone with a prospective client, and I can speak their language and close a deal. At the end of the day, being an entrepreneur is all about making money so you can live to play another day.

Or is it?

It’s also about life and lifestyle.

I feel really compelled to write about this because, though I sorta took a mental break from the tech startup world for a bit while I focused on my job and my new life back in on the east coast (and, you know, survival and keeping a roof over my head), I’ve dipped my toes back into the water.  I am as alarmed today as I was two years ago about the entrepreneurial scam that is peddled by basically everyone.

There’s an entrepreneurial scam?

Funny you should ask! Yes. And it goes something like this: “If you’re not willing to give 24/7 to build your startup or company, you shouldn’t be an entrepreneur”.

Jason Calacanis, famously, said in one of his listserv emails on September 27, 2008, eight days after the market crash of September 19, 2008 and two days after the FDIC seized Washington Mutual Bank, that the sign of someone (paraphrasing here) worth being hired/invested in in the startup world is the person who will gladly come in on Sunday. This was the actual passage from that email:

Hold an optional off-site breakfast meeting on a Sunday and see who shows up: If folks don’t show up for you to grow/save the company on a Sunday for a two hour breakfast, they probably aren’t going to step up when the sh#$%t really hits the fan. You need to know who the real killers on your team are and you need to get close with them now. Again, it’s fine to have 9-5ers on your team–if you’re the Post Office. You can’t have them at a startup company. Note: if you reading this and saying I’m anti-family, save it. Folks don’t have to work at startups and some of the hardest working folks I’ve met have families and figure out how to balance things.

UGH. So much wrong with this sentiment. This sentiment screams, “I am what I do” and that is simply the most self-loathing sentiment you can have. It is neither something to be proud of nor is it healthy mentally or physically. I have a lot of respect for entrepreneurs who will go to the Farmer’s Market on Sunday morning. Or who take their kids to the park. Or who go to brunch with their husband/wife/girlfriend/boyfriend. Not so much for the person who opts to work instead of doing these things.

Here’s what that mentality of roughly 2003-2008 got me. It got me a career, yes. It also got me a divorce and years of my life I will never get back. At nearly 38 years of age, that is a lot to bypass in the service of the almighty dollar, ego, prestige and “fame” (whatever the fuck that means).

While I worked my corporate 9-5, I was coming home and then working another 8 hours on client works, building a company or other nonsense. I neglected my son (who fortunately still loves me to death) and my wife, at the time, by working every night until 3am just to pass out exhausted and wake up at 6:30am to go to work again.

Those lost opportunities to be present were squandered because I bought into the charade that if I work longer and harder, I’ll succeed more and have a better life. Rubbish, hogwash, nyet, NO!

After my ex-wife and I split, I naturally did some soul-searching. Work wasn’t our only problem. But I’d say it was a contributing factor to all the problems I could see. I decided to do a 30-day “work cleanse”… For 30 days, work normal business hours – 9-5, 10-6, whatever… and then put my work down and find something to do to occupy my time. That was a hard thing to do since my work was my identity and my habit. However, after 30 days, I realized I was feeling more energized. I got more sleep. This enabled me to focus better on my work when I was doing it. It helped me get things done faster. I felt more alive.

By and large, this 30 day drill has become my lifestyle now six years later. I typically still work Monday through Friday, 9 to 5. I avoid after hours work or weekend work if I can help it. Though I still take side work, one project at a time in digestible portions, because… a little extra cash every month is nice. But, today, I spend time with my girlfriend, cook dinner sometimes, and do stuff that is fulfilling to my life (usually!) instead of investing all my energy into something that will ultimately fade away.

My greatest fear is that, in my latter years, I will look back on my life with regret, building something that doesn’t last while sacrificing the things that really matter on the altar of snake oil salesmen. You are not what you do. Your time spent does not define your character.

In the words of Trent Reznor Johnny Cash, three months before his wife’s death and seven months before his own:

What have I become 
My sweetest friend 
Everyone I know goes away 
In the end 
And you could have it all 
My empire of dirt 
I will let you down 
I will make you hurt

Looking for a Top Notch WordPress/PHP Developer

If you’re in Baltimore and are a developer, or if you are in Baltimore and know someone who is a developer… Heck, if you’re in DC and are a developer or know a developer, we need you. (You can be to work in under an hour on the MARC train).

Some of you know what I do and who I do it for. I work for a company that has consistently been rated in the top 3 companies to work for. We’re fun and relaxed and our content producers focus on publishing in the financial industry.

Dogs are regularly in the office. We wear shorts and sandals to work. It’s an a-political group – as in office politics. Everyone works well together from the execs down to customer service.

We believe in “Fail cheap and quick” as a lean startup sort of mentality and everyone is empowered to just try stuff if it makes sense.

What *I* do is build awesome web technology to support the business. Plenty of WordPress but now we’re building out huge APIs for reporting and consumer-facing tools. And that’s not WordPress. That’s Laravel and MVC, if you’re curious.

We are looking to add another developer with real chops. PHP, JS, REST APIs, SQL for now with NoSQL as a viable thing for the future. We largely operate on Rackspace and Amazon EC2.

I’d love to hear from you or your developer friend. Send me your resume and cover letter but let me see your github as well!

NSA And Chaos Theory

Look, I’m not for 4th Amendment overreach but this PRISM thing. Let’s be honest…. I’m pretty proud of Americans for developing this ingenious piece of engineering. If it does what it claims to do (and not what the hype says it does), it’s nothing short of one of the major wonders of the modern world.

Think about it.

You, me, everyone… we live in patterns. We go to work, sit at the same desk, talk to the same people, have friends that we see regularly, talk to the roughly same set of people… every day.

But the patterns are not so simple. We may talk to all kinds of different people, go to all kinds of different places, drive all kinds of cars, use all kinds of sites, stay in all kinds of hotels, travel to all kinds of places… and that all seems random but there are patterns like job requirements, hobbies, personal enjoyment and other seemingly abstract glue that makes patterns out of all that too.

Somehow, NSA has found a way to see patterns. Patterns, patterns everywhere. Organized chaos. And seeing patterns helps them see when something is out of pattern. Dissonance. Unusual variety.

The fact that chaos theory can be analyzed in such a way… is truly a feat of engineering.

9 Years of Blogging: Lessons from the Trenches

It is May 20 today and that means two things. First, it’s the 5 year birthday of this handsome boy. Without a doubt, his day will be filled with belly rubs and snacks… as it should be.

But secondly, this is my 9th anniversary of blogging. It’s also the 9th anniversary of me installing WordPress for the first time and embarking on, what would become, a career change and my livelihood. This month, WordPress celebrates it’s 10th birthday which makes me a WordPresser for almost all of the time it has been around.

In that time, I have dabbled in everything from traditional blogging (evolving from political blogging to personal blogging to blogging about blogging to social media blogging to business blogging…. and on and on), to writing code for bloggers use to writing a book for developers to consulting on WordPress projects, etc.

I may have learned something or other along the way. From my 9 years, let me share some of my thoughts:

Blogging Never Killed Journalism

In the hey day, everyone suspected that “old media” was a dying breed and that blogs would overtake old media and replace it. While it is certainly true that old media had to adjust to the digital age, I think it’s more relevant (and healthy!) that blogging began to complement traditional media, as I noted in 2010. Today, most of the major news organizations maintain blogs and journalists wear the hat of traditional reporters and maintain more loosely structured blogs as well.

The same can be said about other forms of digital media – Twitter, primarily, but Reddit and other Social Media destinations as well. While it’s certainly true that breaking news travels much faster on digital platforms (including blogs) than traditional, the fact is that traditional publications still have a relevancy and can get a job done in a better way that digital sometimes.

This is particularly true for long form content. On the internet, there is an inherent ADD that causes many readers (including myself) to get distracted easily and not be able to consume long-form content as easily. If I had to back-of-napkin guess, I’m guessing the sweet-spot for online articles is between 300-700 words. This article will, of course, blow that number out of the water. It is rare that you see great long-form content from publications other than The Atlantic, Ars Technica, the New Yorker, etc.

Notably, it was Sports Illustrated’s print edition that carried the story, that has since been published online, about NBA Center Jason Collins coming out as gay. That was an important piece of journalism with far-reaching political and cultural fallout. And it wasn’t printed online first. It was printed in traditional media.

Get Rich Quick with Blogging? Fugghedabotit!

Oh boy, do I remember the days when everyone fashioned themselves a pro-blogger. Throws some ads up, write content and PROFIT!

While there’s a part of me that wished that model worked (Damn, that would be so easy… I’d never have to work again!!!), life is never that easy. First of all, the advertising bubble was just that… a bubble. The fact that usable metrics (that advertisers with real money wanted) around long-tail sites could boost income was (and still is) a farce. You need to be able to show some level of guarantee of traffic (CPM) or relevancy with a user propensity for buying (CPA). Otherwise, why buy the ad spots at more than “remnant” (i.e. cheap) rates. Remnants aren’t going to pay your salary, much less your coffee bill for the month. I abandoned advertising on this site a long time ago.

Protip: Affiliate advertising still can convert very well and, if handled properly, could potentially earn someone a living.

Data Portability is actually important

Data portability – the ability to take all your content and pick up and go somewhere else – used to be the domain of radical, technarchists like Dave Winer. However, with recent acquisitions of companies like Instagram by Facebook or the very recent Tumblr acquisition by Yahoo!, where reportedly 72,000 Tumblr blogs were moved into the silo in a single day, the ability for users to take their content somewhere else is actually a primary concern these days. It didn’t use to be like this, but notably enough of these events have scared users into wondering what happens when their platform of choice goes out of business or is bought.

Personally, for these reasons as well as things like SEO and domain canonicalization, I’d always recommend people have their own site and use open source self-hosted solutions like or even one of the (in my opinion) inferior open source content management systems out there. Control your own destiny.

Journalistic Integrity

Many bloggers fancy themselves as journalists. They’ve never gone to J school. Never got a degree. Never learned the art of sourcing. All they have is a laptop, a loud mouth and something to rant about.

To be fair, there have been hundreds of bloggers who have turned into amazing journalists in their own right, broke stories, developed sources, protected their integrity with confirmations, etc. Then there’s the rest of bloggers who hear something, run with it, write a story that is poorly sourced (“a source inside Congress told me…”) with little to no confirmable facts and want to be respected as journalists. There’s a reason why real journalists look down their noses at bloggers like this. And rightly so. Also, why everyone looks down their nose at CNN… ahem *cough cough* )

Not to mention the spate of bloggers who have historically expected freebies for “review” or otherwise. Another thing separating real journalists from bloggers.

There are probably dozens of lessons learned from the past 9 years. Don’t hold yourself to a posting schedule… write when you have something to say. I do that here. Maybe a lesser known thing… write drunk, edit sober. Yeah, I have some of my most creative time when drinking. Dumping that stuff onto the proverbial canvas while in that state and hitting “Save Draft” instead of “Publish” means I can come back later and review what I wrote with a clear head.

What tips would you give?