10 Things You Need to Know About WordPress 3.0

By now, you’ve probably heard the hype about WordPress 3.0. You may have even seen the WordPress 3.0 preview webinar I did not too long ago.

This is somewhat of an odd release as I can’t point to 10 individual new features in WordPress. However, I can point to several very large new features that have been hyped enough already. Inside each of these new major things, there are several components. So, let me break the ten things down into three groups. We’re a little behind schedule (thanks to Jane Wells’ cat below) but I think the wait is worth it.

The Merge! WordPress and WordPress Multisite Together At Last

Back at WordCamp San Francisco last year (which is happening this weekend and I will be at), Matt Mullenweg announced that WordPress and WordPress MU would be merging into one singular software package. I covered that shortly after the announcement. The reasoning was that all of the WordPress core was already in sync with WordPress MU and MU simply had a bit more functionality added to it. Most of the code is the same. Why split resources and developers?

WordPress 3.0 is where this merge takes place.

Language Changes

While this is not a new feature in WordPress, existing WordPress MU users may find themselves “thrown” by new terminology involved in WordPress 3.0. In WordPress MU, we had the concept of a “Site” which was an installation of WordPress MU. Within a Site you could have one or more blogs.

In WordPress 3.0, we have the concept of a Network (which was a Site in WordPress MU) and under a Network, we have Sites (which were Blogs). Sites are Blogs. Networks are Sites. Site Admins in WordPress MU are now called Super Admin’s in WordPress 3.0. Making things complicated, we don’t call it WordPress MU anymore. We call it putting WordPress into Multisite mode. Complicated, eh? New WordPress Core Developer, Andrew Nacin, describes this terminology nightmare.

Enabling WordPress for Multisite Mode

Something that is bound to be confusing for users who expect to simply install WordPress and get all the benefits of Multisite out of the gate are bound to be confused by the fact that there is no apparent “switch” to turn it on. When you install WordPress 3.0, it will be in standard WordPress mode. In order to flip the switch, you have to add a new constant to your wp-config.php file. It’s easy, just add the following and save:

define('WP_ALLOW_MULTISITE',true);

Once this is done, you’ll find a new menu item called “Network”  in your Admin under Tools. Visit this page, enable Multisite and follow the instructions. You may need to add new configuration settings to your .htaccess file and wp-config.php, but WordPress will provide these lines for you to copy and paste.

Note: As with WordPress MU, you may need to make server level system changes to enable WordPress to handle subdomains. This is not an easily solved problem and caused heartburn with MU users and will likely continue to cause heartburn with WordPress 3.0 users as well.

Upgrading from WordPress or WordPress MU 2.9 or below

A lot of people, including myself, were concerned about upgrade paths when the Merge was announced. I should have known not to be concerned. WordPress has taken great care for years to ensure backwards compatibility and we’ve done the same thing here. If you’re on WordPress or WordPress MU, you will be able to install WordPress 3.0 and upgrade seamlessly. WordPress MU installs will become WordPress 3.0 with Multisite enabled and single installs of WordPress will retain all the benefits of standard installs of WordPress.

WordPress as a CMS: Custom Post Types and Taxonomies

Developers are already very excited about the new APIs available in WordPress 3.0. Specifically, Custom Post Types (which received initial support in WordPress 2.9). This is a very important set of new features because it finally – finally! – brings CMS support to WordPress. For the first time, we don’t have to simply pretend that WordPress is a CMS…. it can have all the CMS qualities of a Drupal or Joomla.

Custom Post Types

We initially talked about custom post types in WordPress 2.9 but in WordPress 3.0, the feature is fully vetted and able to be utilized. With a simple function in a plugin or theme, developers can create new post types (such as film reviews, podcasts or FAQs), provide entirely familiar UI (similar to posts and pages), etc.

You can find all the possible options under register_post_type() in the wp-includes/post.php file.

Custom Taxonomies

Going hand in hand with custom post types, you can also create custom taxonomies. Taxonomies are bits of metadata and most people think of them in terms of ‘categories’ and ‘tags’. Built into WordPress already are three taxonomies – categories, tags and link categories (which most people think about). The difference, from a technical perspective, between tags and categories is hierarchy. Categories have hierarchy so a category can have a child category, etc. Tags are flat and have no hierarchy.

You can create custom taxonomies with the register_taxonomy() function which will create UI automatically. All the options for custom taxonomies can be found in the wp-includes/taxonomy.php file.

Note: I have created a plugin and made it available for download that demonstrates how to use custom taxonomies and post types.

User Facing Enhancements

There are two major user facing enhancements. When I say two major user facing enhancements, I’m not being sensational. These things are killer and I think you’ll be excited.

Menus

Wow, this has been a controversial new feature. Mostly because it almost didn’t make it into WordPress 3.0 and users have really, really wanted it. Those familiar with the navigation creator in many of the WooThemes will be familiar with the new Menus feature in WordPress. This is because we worked early on with Woo to adopt their premium theme feature, which was very good, into the WordPress core (a fantastic case study on how premium theme developers can work directly with the WordPress core team).

The idea is really simple: Compose any menu with any hierarchy out of category archives, pages and custom links. Once a menu is created and saved, theme developers can enable support for this feature with the following line:

enable_theme_support('nav-menus');

Dropdowns are automatically created and semantic CSS markup allows style modifications easily. You can also create multiple menus (let’s say, a secondary navigation piece) and use them as sidebar widgets or hardcode them directly into a theme.

Default theme… no, no default theme… no, new default theme!

Well, you know all those free themes over on the theme repository? Yeah, most of theme are heavily modified versions of Kubrick, the default theme for WordPress. Theme people would take the code base, modify it and make it their own. They might upload it to the theme repository. Problem is, they would not be updated with the new stuff that would go into Kubrick. That and Kubrick sucked as a theme.

Well, as of WordPress 3.0, there is no more Kubrick. There also is no more Classic theme. Now, we have a new theme called twentyten. Yes, that means next year, we’ll have twentyeleven.

Twentyten is a very complex theme. It should not just be duplicated and hacked up. We want themers to adopt the child theme method of doing things. This is important because as changes go into twentyten, your child theme will inherit those changes.  Here’s a good starter for how to build child themes.

Note: If you are upgrading from previous versions of WordPress and have a child theme based on Kubrick, don’t delete the default theme. If you do, you can still grab the theme from the theme repository.

WordPress Admin Enhancements

The WordPress Administrative interface has also seen enhancements. Jane Wells is our usability expert in the WordPress developers group and has done quite a lot of work. Minor enhancements include an all light-grey style color scheme (as opposed to the dark grey header bar). This does seem to be better on the eyes. Additionally, the themes interface also has a new “tabbed” interface.

Custom Backgrounds

Built into twentyten is a new custom background feature. The cool thing is, theme developers can include this feature in their own theme. Simply adding this function to your theme functions.php will add a new menu item to your Appearance menu that allows for quick modification of the background image on the blog.

add_custom_background();

The Extras

Of course, not everything can fit into the three main areas of feature adds. Some are important and just don’t fit anywhere else.

Admin Username

Many of the security problems that have occurred in WordPress’ history have been a result of the administrative username being admin. This has not been selectable or changeable without hacking the database and changing the admin username there.

In WordPress 3.0, the username can now be selected on install. Here’s a hint…. don’t name it admin. :)

For a complete list of expected changes, see this Codex page.

WordPress 3.0 Preview Webinar

Yesterday, the iThemes folks graciously hosted me for a webinar. I had the opportunity to demonstrate some of the more anticipated features of WordPress 3.0 (due out next month). In the process, I also expressed some of the philosophies in the WordPress community around contributing and shaping the most popular publishing platform on the web.

Some of my answers to questions late in the webinar are directed specifically toward the fringe elements of the community who approach the project from a combative perspective choosing to take pot shots at people and Automattic specifically while never doing a damn thing to push the platform forward. While I’ve left names out of the webinar and this post, the message is clear: if you want to have credibility in the community, learn how to be constructive and own the features and elements you want to see.

But the webinar was not a political statement. In fact, most of it was a hands on demonstration of the new twentyten default theme in WordPress 3.0, the custom taxonomy and post type features which bring WordPress into approximate parity with other content management systems, as well as a preview of “The Merge” – the combination of WordPress MU and WordPress.

Thanks again to the folks over at iThemes. If you missed the Webinar, here it is. Sorry, iPhone and iPad users…. it’s Flash. ;)

WordPress 3.0 Preview with Aaron Brazell from WebDesign.com on Vimeo.

Our lives in a thousand years

A few days ago, I posed a question on Facebook and on Twitter: What will our offspring know about us in a thousand years? It came after a conversation about how what we know about our ancestors has been discovered through archaeology and discovery of physical evidence. We know much about the Egyptians through discovery and exploration of the pyramids, sphinx and pottery. We know what we know about the Roman Empire due to written evidence, scrolls and ruins.

In our digital age of bits and bytes… where tremendous amount of data is stored in non-physical locations (can you say “The Cloud”?), what will be the traceable evidence of our society in a thousand years?

This morning, the Library of Congress announced it was acquiring (weird choice of words as it denotes ownership) the entire archive of tweets sent out via Twitter. Will they print these things out so there are paper copies? How will the digital archives of trillions of little messages  that, individually may be mundane (how many tweets that read similar to: “OMG I <3 bacon!” exist?), be stored in such a way to create a greater texture and context of our society?

Dave Winer, of whom I despise as a person but who has produced some excellent work in the past, has railed on this for some time…. if we own our own content, how will we preserve it when entrusted unilaterally to another service. We send status updates to Facebook without ever thinking about how or where that content will be used in the future. Tweets are sent from mobile devices and the web without ever really considering that, hey, Twitter might sell the rights to this stuff to the Library of Congress…

Not that I feel like there is a problem with this. On the contrary, if anyone is qualified to preserve our generations and society for a thousand years to come, it is the Library of Congress.

For more on this story, check out Read Write Web’s story on the acquisition.

Photo Credit: dhammassociety

Battle of the Titans: Premium Theme Framework Smackdown

I have provided updates for the problems reported with each theme on their pages in this report. We can provide one update per framework as long as something significant has changed (as in a new release of the theme).

For a few days now, I’ve been looking closely at the four major theme frameworks. There are many premium themes. I, in fact, for the time, am using one from Woo Themes that I’ve modified to fit here. However, there are only four that I see as worthy competitors among the elite theme frameworks.

I will be using affiliate links when referencing all of them just because, if you choose to use any of them based on this article, I don’t mind collecting a commission fee. This does not indicate my endorsement of any of them. In fact, quite the opposite. I expect you’ll find me to be a hard, but objective critic of all of them.

The four theme frameworks: Thesis 1.7, Headway 1.6.1, Genesis 1.1.1, and Builder 2.3.11.

Report Scope and Prism

When I went about gathering data on this post, I heard a lot of back and forth from those in the WordPress community about why they liked or disliked each of these themes. Some of the issues were restrictive licensing that flies in the face of the open society that is WordPress. Other things were lingering effects from the Great Premium Theme Pissing Matches™ of 2008. Still others were about how user-friendly the themes were for users. In this report, I put all of that aside and look strictly from the perspective of infrastructure, data, security and WordPress core feature support.

All metrics that have been taken were created equally via a local installation of WordPress (eliminating network latency), with no plugins installed, 10,000 blog posts and 10,000 pages. The data points were taken in the context of a stress test and may or may not reflect actual usage. However, large scale stress is something to be concerned with for any site that is large or plans to become large. How the server handles database transactions, and file load is an integral part of a long term strategy. Each theme was deployed with no configuration changes beyond default settings provided by the theme. The results are fascinating.

This is a seven page article so click through to each new page to read the analysis of each theme.

Photo by icantcu

Doers & Talkers: Cultivating Innovation

via XKCD

A few years ago, I wrote a post called Doers and Talkers where I profiled two types of people in the technology space: Those who have ideas and are visionaries (or talkers) and those who implement those ideas on behalf of others (the doers).

I looked back at that post and realized that, while correct, it was a bit simplistic. In fact, in a world filled with shades of grey, there are more than just doers and talkers.

In review, talkers tend to be the ideas people. They have great ideas, whether in technology, business or just life in general. They see big pictures and tend to have lofty goals. They think quick and often take steps to see their visions implemented, often times without thinking about ramifications and potential pitfalls.

Talkers benefit from irrational thinking. They look at the impossible and, in their own minds, they don’t think it’s impossible. They see limitations as challenges and tend to think that road blocks are only minor inconveniences.

via XKCD
via xkcd

via xkcd

These are the CEOs and founders of the world. These are the people like Steve Jobs of Apple who say, “Phones shouldn’t be this limiting. I should be able to use my natural senses and behaviors to make the phone do what I expect it to do.” Thus, the iPhone was invented with a touch screen interface and technologies like the accelerometer that allow manipulation of the device through natural movement.

Doers, on the other hand, tend to not allow creative thinking. In fact, they tend not to be creative people. They are analytical, engineering types that look at data and extrapolate results based on that data. Doers, in the software world, are the engineers who are handed a list of specs, a timeline and budget, and are told to go and execute.

These people thrive on structure and expectations. They like to know what’s expected and, when they know, are exceptional at delivering results. Doers abhor irrational behavior and approach problems from a perspective of frameworks and architecture. They don’t venture outside their tent posts and, by doing so, are the necessary ingredient for Talkers to see their visions executed.

There really are shades in the middle, however, that are a rare breed. It’s the people in the middle, who both have the business savvy to see big pictures and allow for some degree of dreaming, yet have a firm understanding of expectations and roadmaps that make them so valuable.

See, doers rarely engage with the talkers in providing context or realistic expectation for proposals. Doers don’t really want that role. Doers get into trouble because they don’t know how to speak the language of the talkers. They don’t have the confidence, perhaps, or the desire to take a project and drive a sense of reality into a proposal. That’s above their pay grade, in their minds.

Meanwhile, talkers have an inherent nature, generally, that precludes outside input in decisions. Therefore, they don’t ask, or perhaps even think to ask, the doers for input. They create the business plans and monetization strategies, but rarely think about the implementation. By doing so, they often overlook problems that might be incurred. Talkers are usually distant from the details of the project and so, they tend to miss the detailed tactical decision making process that is employed by the doer.

Finding that personality who has the business understanding to see a 50,000 foot view, interface with management to guide a decisions in a productive manner and who also has the background and understanding to talk to the doers and collect their input is a rare, but important breed. These people should be hired immediately. Create a position if necessary but don’t let them escape.

These types of personalities tend to be excellent product managers and, in a technical environment, can really steer a product in a productive direction.

For what it’s worth, Google has instituted, for many years now, 20% time. This is the policy that states that every Google employee, regardless of role or position, is allowed 20% of their work week to work on any project that they want to. Allowing the doers, talkers and that happy middle the opportunity to be creative, to be structured and to foster ideas, has resulted in many Google Labs projects.

Notably, some of the best Google products used today, have come out of 20% time projects: Gmail, Google News and Google Reader. Additionally, many features (such as keyboard shortcuts in a variety of Google products) have also been added to existing Google products as a result of 20% time. There is even a blind engineer who created Google’s Accessible Search product.

While doers are important, and talkers are important, finding a way to foster open communication and understanding between them is essential for innovation.

Working SXSW (And How I Will Be Hired)

SXSW Interactive is now over and with it comes a big long exhale. For those who were here who I saw, it is always good to catch up and meet new people. For those I missed, let’s connect online somewhere.

This year I came with one goal in mind: to find a job. I didn’t come for the parties. I didn’t come for the constant, lame fist pumping and business card sluttery. I came to find a job. To that end, I did not get a badge. That may seem counter-intuitive but, in fact, worked tremendously in my favor. Every day of the event, I tracked down people who I thought could help me in some way. Shameless? Perhaps. The reality is that karma is always something that goes around.

Photo by AllAboutGeorge on Flickr

I’m not about to do the namedrop thing where I list everyone I talk to. That’s lame and it’s really no one’s business but mine. But what I do want to address what I do because, as much as I have been a public face, there are a lot of public faces and it’s become clear over the past few months that a lot of people really have no idea what I do or what I want to do. They want to help, but when all I can be introduced to an executive at a company as, “a really famous blogger,” then there is a disconnect in my own personal messaging. As more companies are discovering that I am on the market, they really want to know what I’m about.

In short, my official bio can be summed up as: “I am a business-savvy author and PHP developer who has led development teams, managed technical product lifecycles and have built up enough social capital and marketing prowess to put any agency to shame.”

In greater detail, I come from a PHP development background having coded for the last 10 years. I still do that. As part of that, I have been part of the WordPress community as a core contributor for years and have built a reputation as a high-end WordPress “data guy” (as opposed to a design guy). I build plugins and do architecture stuff, for the uninitiated. I have led development teams. Remotely. Which is hard to do. We built products for the internal growth, analytics and monitoring of our company and for our investors. Very nimble, very small, very distributed teams.

Somewhere in the past five years, I became a marketer. Not really because I don’t have a degree in communications and I don’t really do marketing. But I know how to do marketing well and can run circles around Agency types who like to ask, “Do you have Agency experience?” and then don’t want to talk because I don’t. Son, I could school your entire Agency.

I came to SXSW to find a job. Specifically, I came to find a job in Austin or a job where I could at least move to Austin. I have several solid leads from the resulting conversations and introductions. I did it by being real and not trying to be someone bigger than I am. I did it by acknowledging my own strengths. And my own weaknesses. I didn’t get caught up in the scene. It’s a distraction.

As a result, for the first time in four years, my SXSW experience was better during the day than at night during all the parties.

I don’t know if I will find the technical job with a business and public-side interface that I’m looking for. But I do know that there are people now who know that I can run a development team to build a kickass product that is going to need the grassroots, public-facing social capital that I’ve built up. I think I met a few this week. Here’s to hoping.

The Most Expensive Question

What's the Point?

The most expensive question you can ask a consultant is, “What else do you recommend?”

This seems like a simple thing. At least if you’re a consultant. Potential clients approach you and they know they need something done. They may have a good idea of what that something is and they may even be able to provide a wish list of things to get done. However, for all that preparedness they ruin it all for their budget by asking, “What else do you recommend?”

Now some consultants do business this way. They are paid to help the client understand their needs and map out a solution. However, understand that this is a very expensive proposition in most cases. Hours of meetings and calls and emails exchanged back and forth can go into defining the scope, as we call it.

What's the Point?
Image by skipnclick on Flickr

We’ll usually approach the client with open ended questions to get a high level view of the client project.

  • What are you trying to accomplish?
  • What is your ideal end result?
  • What problems are you trying to solve?

Once I get a broad picture of the project, I can schedule conference calls with relevant parties to discuss each answer to each question. This is for the purpose of defining the details. Each call could take an hour or more and might span more than one call. This is all billable.

At the end of these series of calls/meetings, we still might have a bunch of email exchanging to do. This is even before we begin doing actual work. You can easily rack up thousands of dollars during this process.

The next phase of the project involves deliverables. Having defined all the scope details, the project probably goes on Basecamp or some similar project management service. Most consultants have a “floor” that is a minimum threshhold. I know people who will not work on projects below $50k. Others won’t work below $25k.

At this point, if the client is still not mentally committed to a path, there can be a lot of potential for “Scope creep”. That is, when the scope of the project slowly expands to incorporate other areas not defined in the agreed upon scope. Good consultants see this coming and can either agree to it pro-bono (bad policy), agree to it as an added service/feature (billable) or convince the client the idea is bad (it might be).

Scope creep is rarely good for the client, though. You’re definitely going to get billed for it when working with most consultants.

Bringing this full circle, however, you can mitigate your costs when dealing with consultants by having a really firm idea as to what and why you want to do from a high level. Leave the details to the consultant to work out, but strategically know where you’re going. If you can define the scope (wireframes are always helpful), you can lessen your cost even more.

The more we as consultants have to do, the more you’ll pay. We don’t mind helping, but if money is an issue, be careful and come prepared.

And for God’s sake, don’t ask “What else do you recommend?” We can make a mint off that question.

Threadsy Aggregates Email, Facebook and Twitter (plus invites!)

TechCrunch 50 startup and runner-up Threadsy reached out to me earlier to look at their service. I’m not usually one to do that but I had some time and their street cred seemed legitimate (TC50, etc).

The service is an aggregation tool that pulls email accounts (Gmail, Yahoo, even IMAP to name a few) together. I couldn’t get my IMAP email account functional but that could just be me. It’s been awhile since I had to configure email addresses manually. My Gmail account imported successfully without any special configuration.

In addition to email accounts, Threadsy also aggregates your Facebook Inbox as well as Twitter. Though no differentiation (visually) seems to exist for DMs and public messages in Twitter, it did manage to aggregate everything nicely and order them in the proper order. I’ve noticed that other products that trie to do this always seem to be a little glitchy on timestamps and sorting, so I appreciated this.

What you get is a consolidated inbox, as seen below. It’s very interactive and clicking on messages brings up helpful information about the sender.

The experience is also very smooth with interactive visual elements (swooshes and what not… to be technical).

My big question surrounding this service is why? There already seem to be a lot of social inbox tools. Gmail is increasingly becoming one everyday with the addition of Buzz, though it does not yet support aggregation of Twitter and Facebook content. I can see the benefits, but I wonder how many users will be sold on it.

Try it for yourself though. The first thousand people to click on this link get into the private beta program. Let me know how you feel about it.

Your SXSW Survival Guide

Next week begins the 2010 edition of South by Southwest (SXSW) with the Interactive and Film festivals. This will be followed in the following week by the legendary music festival. As a veteran of SXSW (This will be my fourth year), let me share my tips from a Pro standpoint. Mind you, these tips are an aggregation of lessons learned over the years. Many new people come every year, and most have no idea what to expect. You can review my SXSW power tips from last year.

Parties

SXSW is known less for it’s sessions and more for its parties. For better or for worse, the best networking and results come out of the parties. It is not a drunk fest like many think it is. Okay, it can be. But generally, it’s just a bunch of industry folks catching up with each other, enjoying the early Texas spring night times, having some drinks, blowing off steam and rebuilding relationships. Good business comes out of good relationships.

Julia Allison, Brittany Bohnet and Randi Zuckerberg at SXSW 2009

As a veteran, I am constantly asked if I can take newbies under my wings and guide them. Let me be unequivocally clear: No. I cannot. I will not. Now that that’s out of the way, understand that there are 10,000 people wandering around for SXSW. There is plenty to do and my agenda won’t be everyone’s agenda. RSVP for any party you think you might go to and blaze your own path.

Alcohol

There are more than enough opportunities for free booze. It is not hard to take advantage of this. It’s also not hard to get drunk and all. Be very careful. Maintain your buzz. Don’t get drunk. If you get drunk, you run a chance of being hungover the next day. That ruins the next day. Then you’re likely to get drunk again the next night. Instead, maintain your buzz. If you absolutely have to get wasted, wait for the last night before you go home (You didn’t get a 7am flight, did you?). It’s much easier to maintain a flatline than to have the up and down effect of multiple drunken nights and the impending hungover day.

Meet People

This is somewhat cliché but I swear, if you come to SXSW looking for someone to introduce you to people, then you’re going to be disappointed. You get out of SXSW what you put into it. Don’t rely on someone else to make your trip productive. Get outside of your industry. Get outside your comfort zone. I’ve heard SXSW described as the one event where the attendees come to see attendees, not speakers. Go meet people. Say hi to Guy Kawasaki. Don’t say hi to Loren Feldman. ;-)

You Can’t Be Everywhere, You Can’t Meet Everyone

So don’t try.

Hotels and Lodging

At this point, it’s too late to get a hotel near the convention center. Rent a car and stay out by the airport, but realize you’ll pay cab fees or the car rental – depending on your choice. While hotels are cheaper, you will make up for it in travel. And it can be darn inconvenient in the evening. If you know people who are going, pay them to sleep on their hotel room floors if you can. It’s uncomfortable but probably worth it. Don’t ask me. I’ve already got similar arrangements.

Anything else? Veterans? More tips to add. Add them in comments below.

How to get a Great Tech Job

This post is a guest post from Sandy Smith, a hiring manager and PHP developer at Forum One Communications in Alexandria, VA. It was originally an email to a mailing list in response to a job ad posted by a recruiter. The job requisition was worded in such a way to make it sound like the recruiter wanted someone with every web-tech skill and a “mastery” of it for about $75,000 (USD), a salary that is extremely low in the Washington, D.C. area. His response was so good that I asked if I could reprint it. He obliged. Follow Sandy on Twitter at @SandyS1 or at his blog.

So, random thoughts from a hiring manager, speaking entirely for myself, not for my company (My team has no open positions, though Forum One is hiring):

1) This is perhaps not the best job ad in history but it is not that bad. “Mastery” is a very vague word, and nobody wants to advertise for someone who’s “mediocre” at PHP, etc. So cut them a little slack that word, which seems to be the big problem for most people.

2) Learn to read job ads for what they really want. They almost all must pass through an HR person who is NOT a programmer, and sometimes vetted language is helpfully “punched up” by some editor before going out, not realizing they’re effectively changing the requirements by using more “positive” and “colorful” language. I’m going to use “needless” “quotes” some more, “here.”

3) When we’ve worked with recruiters–and I assure you as a hiring manager I see the same ratio of good/bad ones (hint: don’t call me to ask about a position and then demonstrate that you never bothered to visit the company website to look at the description we have posted–and hint: when I say I don’t deal with recruiters and you’ll have to talk to the same HR person who didn’t call you back the last time, you not getting a gig doesn’t mean I’m suddenly empowered to deal with recruiters…so…don’t call me), we’ve usually just supplied a position description to them. They didn’t alter it much, so the wording may not have changed much if someone from the hiring org posted it themselves.

4) The years of experience and the main technologies mentioned are the important parts of a job ad, as are some of the “types of work environment” experience credentials. The extra stuff is usually requested by the HR person to give them a way to sort through the avalanche of applicants, most of whom are barely if at all qualified, who arrive in their inbox. So if there is, as I once abused a quasi-governmental agency for requesting, a ‘magical pony who craps rainbow sherbet is flitting around a meadow somewhere thinking to itself, “You know, I think I’d rather have a government web job,”’ they can find it.

5) The key word is “Drupal.” They’re not really asking for somebody who can invent a new algorithm better than quicksort or even bridge C++ to Ada to PL/SQL to PHP or implement a perfect Strategy pattern using techniques borrowed from OCaml…they’re asking for a PHP web developer who can configure, theme, and write some custom modules for Drupal that might work with some outside systems that others seem to be responsible for. Your best bet is to send in a competently formatted (and spell-checked–seriously, do not put “detail-oriented” and have spelling errors) resume and a cover letter addressing the important points and showing how your experience matches those points.

6) And yeah, if you can’t hang some Javascript and CSS with XHTML onto those template files, then you’re probably not right for the job, and you should move on. And start Googling some tutorials because I know I expect basic Javascript, CSS, and X/HTML out of even backend PHP developers.

7) There are a lot of people applying for much lower-paying jobs, but quite frankly, there are a lot of people who believe in spamming every open position they find with the same resume regardless of whether they’re qualified or not. Trust me, it’s really obvious to the people on the other side when you do this. You will get much better results if you target your application to the position, and skip ones that you know you’re not really right for. I realize this is hard when you’re not currently working, but a better effort on likely positions will get you more than minimal effort on every position you find.

8) Not every technical team is that great, and even if they are, they aren’t always great at finding the right people for the job, as the temptation is to hire someone like yourself, because hey, you’re awesome! Even if someone like yourself isn’t really right for the job. It’s not smart, but it’s really human. So while I have many issues with recruiters, I don’t think you can always lay the blame at their feet for not making their clients smarter. Who among us hasn’t had to swallow our pride and do something kinda dumb because the guy with the money said he didn’t care, he just wanted it that way?

9) If your organization is hiring for a PHP-centric position and you haven’t posted the job ad here–and there’s no legal/contractual reason you can’t–for heaven’s sake, why???

10) None of this is to suggest that recruiters don’t have problems of bullet-point matching that other people have brought up, or that they shouldn’t match candidates to positions using something better than what any random HR person can do in order to make them worth the money.

Photo by Utopian Branch Library